Background: The application of massive parallel sequencing technologies in the molecular analysis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) has enabled the rapid and cost-effective identification of numerous potentially significant variants for diagnostic purposes. The objective is to reduce the number of variants, focusing only on those with pathogenic significance. The 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) guidelines aid in achieving this goal, but it is now evident that a pathology or gene-specific review of these rules is essential to avoid misinterpretations that may result from blindly applying the criteria. This study demonstrates how revised ACMG criteria, combined with CMT-specific literature data and expertise, can alter the final classification of a variant. Methods: We reviewed ACMG criteria based on current knowledge of CMT and provided suggestions for adapting them to the specificities of CMT. Results: Of the 226 index patients analysed, a diagnostic yield of 20% was obtained. It is worth noting that the 9% of cases had their final diagnosis changed with the application of the revised criteria, often resulting in the loss of the pathogenic classification of a variant. Conclusions: The widespread availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled genetic testing even for laboratories without specific disease expertise. Disease-specific ACMG criteria can be a valuable tool to prevent the proliferation of variants of uncertain significance and the misinterpretation of variants.

Next-generation sequencing in Charcot-Marie-Tooth: a proposal for improvement of ACMG guidelines for variant evaluation

Geroldi, Alessandro;Mammi, Alessia;Gaudio, Andrea;Patrone, Serena;Origone, Paola;Ponti, Clarissa;Sanguineri, Francesca;Massucco, Sara;Marinelli, Lucio;Grandis, Marina;Schenone, Angelo;Mandich, Paola;Bellone, Emilia;Gotta, Fabio
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: The application of massive parallel sequencing technologies in the molecular analysis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) has enabled the rapid and cost-effective identification of numerous potentially significant variants for diagnostic purposes. The objective is to reduce the number of variants, focusing only on those with pathogenic significance. The 2015 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) guidelines aid in achieving this goal, but it is now evident that a pathology or gene-specific review of these rules is essential to avoid misinterpretations that may result from blindly applying the criteria. This study demonstrates how revised ACMG criteria, combined with CMT-specific literature data and expertise, can alter the final classification of a variant. Methods: We reviewed ACMG criteria based on current knowledge of CMT and provided suggestions for adapting them to the specificities of CMT. Results: Of the 226 index patients analysed, a diagnostic yield of 20% was obtained. It is worth noting that the 9% of cases had their final diagnosis changed with the application of the revised criteria, often resulting in the loss of the pathogenic classification of a variant. Conclusions: The widespread availability of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled genetic testing even for laboratories without specific disease expertise. Disease-specific ACMG criteria can be a valuable tool to prevent the proliferation of variants of uncertain significance and the misinterpretation of variants.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1182515
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