Analytical methods for confirmation of food authenticity claims should be rapid, economic, non-destructive and should not require highly skilled personnel for their deployment. All such conditions are satisfied by spectroscopic techniques. In order to be extensively implemented in routine controls, an ideal method should also give a response independent of the particular equipment used. In the present study, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used for verifying authenticity of commercial olives in brine of cultivar Taggiasca. Samples were analysed in two laboratories with different NIR spectrometers and a mathematical spectral transfer correction – the boxcar signal transfer (BST) – was developed, allowing to minimise the systematic differences existing between signals recorded with the two instruments. Class models for the verification of olive authenticity were built by the unequal dispersed classes (UNEQ) method, after data compression by disjoint principal component analysis (PCA). Models were validated on an external test set.

A spectral transfer procedure for application of a single class-model to spectra recorded by different near-infrared spectrometers for authentication of olives in brine

OLIVERI, PAOLO;CASOLINO, MARIA CHIARA;CASALE, MONICA;LANTERI, SILVIA
2013

Abstract

Analytical methods for confirmation of food authenticity claims should be rapid, economic, non-destructive and should not require highly skilled personnel for their deployment. All such conditions are satisfied by spectroscopic techniques. In order to be extensively implemented in routine controls, an ideal method should also give a response independent of the particular equipment used. In the present study, near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used for verifying authenticity of commercial olives in brine of cultivar Taggiasca. Samples were analysed in two laboratories with different NIR spectrometers and a mathematical spectral transfer correction – the boxcar signal transfer (BST) – was developed, allowing to minimise the systematic differences existing between signals recorded with the two instruments. Class models for the verification of olive authenticity were built by the unequal dispersed classes (UNEQ) method, after data compression by disjoint principal component analysis (PCA). Models were validated on an external test set.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/697567
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