Background: Obesity is associated with NAFLD, and bariatric surgery has significant impact on this liver disease, with reported improvement in hepatic fibrosis. Aims: To investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on long-term liver disease-related outcome in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and significant liver damage. Methods: This study included 56 NAFLD patients who underwent bilio-pancreatic diversion for morbid obesity and who had significant fibrosis at intraoperative liver biopsy. Data were analyzed at 1, 3, and 5 years of follow-up, and at the latest available visit in patients who had longer follow-up. We assessed the incidence of clinically relevant liver events (ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, portal hypertension-related bleeding, and jaundice) as well as modifications of a validated biochemical index such as the NAFLD score. Results: During a median follow-up of 78 months, median weight decreased from 119 to 78 kg (P < 0.0001), and median body mass index decreased from 45.2 to 29.0 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). None of the patients developed clinical complications of liver disease, and none died due to liver-related causes. Median NAFLD score significantly decreased (P = 0.0005) during follow-up from − 0.929 (− 1.543 to − 0.561) to − 1.609 (− 2.056 to − 1.102). The NAFLD score category was unchanged in 32 patients (57%), improved in 18 (32%), and worsened in 6 (11%). Conclusions: Patients with NAFLD and proven histological liver damage at surgery do not develop complications of liver disease in long term after bilio-pancreatic diversion. Moreover, noninvasive parameters of liver damage improve. Thus, preexisting liver damage does not seem to be a contraindication to bilio-pancreatic diversion.

Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Liver-Related Outcome After Bilio-Pancreatic Diversion in Patients with Initial, Significant Liver Damage

Giannini, Edoardo G.;Coppo, Claudia;Romana, Chiara;Camerini, Giovanni;De Cian, Franco;Scopinaro, Nicola;Papadia, Francesco S.
2018

Abstract

Background: Obesity is associated with NAFLD, and bariatric surgery has significant impact on this liver disease, with reported improvement in hepatic fibrosis. Aims: To investigate the effects of bariatric surgery on long-term liver disease-related outcome in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and significant liver damage. Methods: This study included 56 NAFLD patients who underwent bilio-pancreatic diversion for morbid obesity and who had significant fibrosis at intraoperative liver biopsy. Data were analyzed at 1, 3, and 5 years of follow-up, and at the latest available visit in patients who had longer follow-up. We assessed the incidence of clinically relevant liver events (ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, portal hypertension-related bleeding, and jaundice) as well as modifications of a validated biochemical index such as the NAFLD score. Results: During a median follow-up of 78 months, median weight decreased from 119 to 78 kg (P < 0.0001), and median body mass index decreased from 45.2 to 29.0 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001). None of the patients developed clinical complications of liver disease, and none died due to liver-related causes. Median NAFLD score significantly decreased (P = 0.0005) during follow-up from − 0.929 (− 1.543 to − 0.561) to − 1.609 (− 2.056 to − 1.102). The NAFLD score category was unchanged in 32 patients (57%), improved in 18 (32%), and worsened in 6 (11%). Conclusions: Patients with NAFLD and proven histological liver damage at surgery do not develop complications of liver disease in long term after bilio-pancreatic diversion. Moreover, noninvasive parameters of liver damage improve. Thus, preexisting liver damage does not seem to be a contraindication to bilio-pancreatic diversion.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/901887
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