Near 75% of all breast cancers (BC) express estrogen receptors (ER) and/or progesterone receptors (PgR), while up to 20% of BC show an overexpression/amplification of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). Around 50% of all HER2-overexpressing BC show the coexistence of both HER2 overexpression/amplification and ER and/or PgR overexpression. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest the existence of a cross-talk between their downstream pathways, which seem to affect the natural history, response to therapy and outcome of patients affected by this subset of BC. Meta-analyses or subgroup analysis of numerous neo-/adjuvant trials demonstrated significant clinical implications deriving from ER/HER2 co-existence, consisting in a different pattern of relapse and dissimilar outcome in response to anti-HER2 therapy. However, only two randomized trials in early disease and three in advanced disease specifically addressed the issue whether a combined approach with both hormonal and anti-HER2 therapy would have a better therapeutic impact in this subset of BC compared to the lone anti-HER2 or hormonal therapies (HT). None of these trials demonstrated improvements in overall survival, even though several efficacy end-points such as progression free survival, in advanced setting, or pCR rates in neoadjuvant setting, often favored the combined hormonal and anti-HER2 therapeutic approach. In the next few years, a certain number of ongoing randomized trials, both in neoadjuvant and advanced setting, will evaluate the efficacy of new anti-HER2 drugs, T-DM1 and pertuzumab, in combination with HT, helping to improve the therapeutic strategy for this specific subtype of breast tumors. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Hormone Receptor/Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive breast cancer: Where we are now and where we are going

Del Mastro, Lucia
2016

Abstract

Near 75% of all breast cancers (BC) express estrogen receptors (ER) and/or progesterone receptors (PgR), while up to 20% of BC show an overexpression/amplification of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). Around 50% of all HER2-overexpressing BC show the coexistence of both HER2 overexpression/amplification and ER and/or PgR overexpression. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest the existence of a cross-talk between their downstream pathways, which seem to affect the natural history, response to therapy and outcome of patients affected by this subset of BC. Meta-analyses or subgroup analysis of numerous neo-/adjuvant trials demonstrated significant clinical implications deriving from ER/HER2 co-existence, consisting in a different pattern of relapse and dissimilar outcome in response to anti-HER2 therapy. However, only two randomized trials in early disease and three in advanced disease specifically addressed the issue whether a combined approach with both hormonal and anti-HER2 therapy would have a better therapeutic impact in this subset of BC compared to the lone anti-HER2 or hormonal therapies (HT). None of these trials demonstrated improvements in overall survival, even though several efficacy end-points such as progression free survival, in advanced setting, or pCR rates in neoadjuvant setting, often favored the combined hormonal and anti-HER2 therapeutic approach. In the next few years, a certain number of ongoing randomized trials, both in neoadjuvant and advanced setting, will evaluate the efficacy of new anti-HER2 drugs, T-DM1 and pertuzumab, in combination with HT, helping to improve the therapeutic strategy for this specific subtype of breast tumors. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/890386
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