Manganese and zinc were selected as alloying elements to develop a Mg-based ternary alloy for biomedical applications, taking into account the good biocompatibility of these metals. The microstructures of Mg–Zn–Mn alloys containing 0.5 or 1.0 mass% of manganese and 1.0 or 1.5 mass% of zinc were investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Their corrosion properties were assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in Ringer's physiological solution that simulates bodily fluids. All tested samples are two-phase alloys formed by a Mg-based matrix, consisting of a Mg–Zn–Mn solid solution, and a Mg–Zn binary phase. The electrochemical results show an improvement of the corrosion behavior of the investigated alloys with increasing Zn and Mn content. This is attributed to the formation of a partially protective Mg(OH)2 surface film whose protective capabilities are increased by the alloying elements. The reduced influence of the Mg–Zn intermetallic compound on the corrosion rate of Mg–Zn–Mn alloys in the presence of a partially protective surface layer can be ascribed to an increasing resistance between the Mg–Zn–Mn solid solution and the second phase, thereby decreasing the effective driving force for microgalvanic corrosion. Owing to its highest corrosion protective ability, the Mg–1.5Zn–1Mn alloy is a promising candidate for the development of degradable implants, such as screws, plates, and rods

Microstructure and in vitro degradation performance of Mg–Zn–Mn alloys for biomedical application

DE NEGRI, SERENA;SACCONE, ADRIANA
2013-01-01

Abstract

Manganese and zinc were selected as alloying elements to develop a Mg-based ternary alloy for biomedical applications, taking into account the good biocompatibility of these metals. The microstructures of Mg–Zn–Mn alloys containing 0.5 or 1.0 mass% of manganese and 1.0 or 1.5 mass% of zinc were investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Their corrosion properties were assessed by means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements performed in Ringer's physiological solution that simulates bodily fluids. All tested samples are two-phase alloys formed by a Mg-based matrix, consisting of a Mg–Zn–Mn solid solution, and a Mg–Zn binary phase. The electrochemical results show an improvement of the corrosion behavior of the investigated alloys with increasing Zn and Mn content. This is attributed to the formation of a partially protective Mg(OH)2 surface film whose protective capabilities are increased by the alloying elements. The reduced influence of the Mg–Zn intermetallic compound on the corrosion rate of Mg–Zn–Mn alloys in the presence of a partially protective surface layer can be ascribed to an increasing resistance between the Mg–Zn–Mn solid solution and the second phase, thereby decreasing the effective driving force for microgalvanic corrosion. Owing to its highest corrosion protective ability, the Mg–1.5Zn–1Mn alloy is a promising candidate for the development of degradable implants, such as screws, plates, and rods
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/697371
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