Cable-suspended robots may move beyond their static workspace by keeping all cables under tension, thanks to end-effector inertia forces. This may be used to extend the robot capabilities, by choosing suitable dynamical trajectories. In this paper, we consider three-dimensional (3D) elliptical trajectories of a point-mass end effector suspended by three cables from a base of generic geometry. Elliptical trajectories are the most general type of spatial sinusoidal motions. We find a range of admissible frequencies for which said trajectories are feasible; we also show that there is a special frequency, which allows the robot to have arbitrarily large oscillations. The feasibility of these trajectories is verified via algebraic conditions that can be quickly verified, thus being compatible with real-time applications. By generalizing previous studies, we also study the possibility to change the frequency of oscillation: this allows the velocity at which a given ellipse is tracked to be varied, thus providing more latitude in the trajectory definition. We finally study transition trajectories to move the robot from an initial state of rest (within the static workspace) to the elliptical trajectory (and vice versa) or to connect two identical ellipses having different centers.

Dynamically feasible periodic trajectories for generic spatial three-degree-of-freedom cable-suspended parallel robots

MOTTOLA, GIOVANNI;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Cable-suspended robots may move beyond their static workspace by keeping all cables under tension, thanks to end-effector inertia forces. This may be used to extend the robot capabilities, by choosing suitable dynamical trajectories. In this paper, we consider three-dimensional (3D) elliptical trajectories of a point-mass end effector suspended by three cables from a base of generic geometry. Elliptical trajectories are the most general type of spatial sinusoidal motions. We find a range of admissible frequencies for which said trajectories are feasible; we also show that there is a special frequency, which allows the robot to have arbitrarily large oscillations. The feasibility of these trajectories is verified via algebraic conditions that can be quickly verified, thus being compatible with real-time applications. By generalizing previous studies, we also study the possibility to change the frequency of oscillation: this allows the velocity at which a given ellipse is tracked to be varied, thus providing more latitude in the trajectory definition. We finally study transition trajectories to move the robot from an initial state of rest (within the static workspace) to the elliptical trajectory (and vice versa) or to connect two identical ellipses having different centers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1115826
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