Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most deadly and commonly diagnosed tumors worldwide. Several genes are involved in its development and progression. The most frequent mutations concern APC, KRAS, SMAD4, and TP53 genes, suggesting that CRC relies on the concomitant alteration of the related pathways. However, with classic molecular approaches, it is not easy to simultaneously analyze the interconnections between these pathways. To overcome this limitation, recently these pathways have been included in a huge chemical reaction network (CRN) describing how information sensed from the environment by growth factors is processed by healthy colorectal cells. Starting from this CRN, we propose a computational model which simulates the effects induced by single or multiple concurrent mutations on the global signaling network. The model has been tested in three scenarios. First, we have quantified the changes induced on the concentration of the proteins of the network by a mutation in APC, KRAS, SMAD4, or TP53. Second, we have computed the changes in the concentration of p53 induced by up to two concurrent mutations affecting proteins upstreams in the network. Third, we have considered a mutated cell affected by a gain of function of KRAS, and we have simulated the action of Dabrafenib, showing that the proposed model can be used to determine the most effective amount of drug to be delivered to the cell. In general, the proposed approach displays several advantages, in that it allows to quantify the alteration in the concentration of the proteins resulting from a single or multiple given mutations. Moreover, simulations of the global signaling network of CRC may be used to identify new therapeutic targets, or to disclose unexpected interactions between the involved pathways.

Computational quantification of global effects induced by mutations and drugs in signaling networks of colorectal cancer cells

Sommariva S.;Caviglia G.;Ravera S.;Frassoni F.;Benvenuto F.;Tortolina L.;Castagnino N.;Parodi S.;Piana M.
2021

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most deadly and commonly diagnosed tumors worldwide. Several genes are involved in its development and progression. The most frequent mutations concern APC, KRAS, SMAD4, and TP53 genes, suggesting that CRC relies on the concomitant alteration of the related pathways. However, with classic molecular approaches, it is not easy to simultaneously analyze the interconnections between these pathways. To overcome this limitation, recently these pathways have been included in a huge chemical reaction network (CRN) describing how information sensed from the environment by growth factors is processed by healthy colorectal cells. Starting from this CRN, we propose a computational model which simulates the effects induced by single or multiple concurrent mutations on the global signaling network. The model has been tested in three scenarios. First, we have quantified the changes induced on the concentration of the proteins of the network by a mutation in APC, KRAS, SMAD4, or TP53. Second, we have computed the changes in the concentration of p53 induced by up to two concurrent mutations affecting proteins upstreams in the network. Third, we have considered a mutated cell affected by a gain of function of KRAS, and we have simulated the action of Dabrafenib, showing that the proposed model can be used to determine the most effective amount of drug to be delivered to the cell. In general, the proposed approach displays several advantages, in that it allows to quantify the alteration in the concentration of the proteins resulting from a single or multiple given mutations. Moreover, simulations of the global signaling network of CRC may be used to identify new therapeutic targets, or to disclose unexpected interactions between the involved pathways.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1066448
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