At glutamatergic synapses, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be induced at the same synaptic activation frequency. Instructive signals determine whether LTP or LTD is induced, by modulating local calcium transients. Synapses maintain the ability to potentiate or depress over a wide frequency range, but it remains unknown how calcium-controlled plasticity operates when frequency variations alone cause differences in calcium amplitudes. We addressed this problem at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, which can undergo LTD or LTP in response to 1-Hz and 100-Hz stimulation. We observed that high-frequency activation elicits larger spine calcium transients than low-frequency stimulation under all stimulus conditions, but, regardless of activation frequency, climbing fiber (CF) coactivation provides an instructive signal that further enhances calcium transients and promotes LTD. At both frequencies, buffering calcium prevents LTD induction and LTP results instead, identifying the enhanced calcium signal amplitude as the critical parameter contributed by the instructive CF signal. These observations show that it is not absolute calcium amplitudes that determine whether LTD or LTP is evoked but, instead, the LTD threshold slides, thus preserving the requirement for relatively larger calcium transients for LTD than for LTP induction at any given stimulus frequency. Cerebellar LTD depends on the activation of calcium/ calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Using genetically modified (TT305/6VA and T305D) mice, we identified α-CaMKII inhibition upon autophosphorylation at Thr305/306 as a molecular event underlying the threshold shift. This mechanism enables frequencyindependent plasticity control by the instructive CF signal based on relative, not absolute, calcium thresholds.

Calcium threshold shift enables frequency-independent control of plasticity by an instructive signal

Grasselli G.;
2016

Abstract

At glutamatergic synapses, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) can be induced at the same synaptic activation frequency. Instructive signals determine whether LTP or LTD is induced, by modulating local calcium transients. Synapses maintain the ability to potentiate or depress over a wide frequency range, but it remains unknown how calcium-controlled plasticity operates when frequency variations alone cause differences in calcium amplitudes. We addressed this problem at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, which can undergo LTD or LTP in response to 1-Hz and 100-Hz stimulation. We observed that high-frequency activation elicits larger spine calcium transients than low-frequency stimulation under all stimulus conditions, but, regardless of activation frequency, climbing fiber (CF) coactivation provides an instructive signal that further enhances calcium transients and promotes LTD. At both frequencies, buffering calcium prevents LTD induction and LTP results instead, identifying the enhanced calcium signal amplitude as the critical parameter contributed by the instructive CF signal. These observations show that it is not absolute calcium amplitudes that determine whether LTD or LTP is evoked but, instead, the LTD threshold slides, thus preserving the requirement for relatively larger calcium transients for LTD than for LTP induction at any given stimulus frequency. Cerebellar LTD depends on the activation of calcium/ calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII). Using genetically modified (TT305/6VA and T305D) mice, we identified α-CaMKII inhibition upon autophosphorylation at Thr305/306 as a molecular event underlying the threshold shift. This mechanism enables frequencyindependent plasticity control by the instructive CF signal based on relative, not absolute, calcium thresholds.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1064188
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