Although essential for a successful pregnancy, a growing body of evidence suggests that maternal inflammation, when dysregulated, may represent a risk factor for both maternal and neonatal outcomes. Here, we assessed the accuracy of maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations at the middle phase of pregnancy in the identification of maternal adverse outcomes (MAO) until delivery. A correlation between CRP and a complicated pregnancy including both maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes has been investigated, too. In this retrospective study, conducted at the Diabetology Unit of IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa (Italy), 380 outpatient pregnant women have been enrolled at the prenatal visit before performing a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24th-26th gestational week for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening. Demographic, medical, and reproductive history has been obtained by verbal interview. Data about pregnancy and delivery have been retrieved from medical records. The median value of maternal baseline serum CRP was 3.25 μg/mL. Women experiencing MAO were older, more frequently suffering from hypertension, and showed higher CRP concentrations, with a cutoff value >1.86 μg/mL found by a ROC curve analysis to be accurately predictive for MAO. By a logistic regression analysis, serum CRP levels >1.86 μg/mL have been found to predict MAO also considering maternal age, hypertension, and GDM. Maternal CRP levels have been positively associated with overall pregnancy adverse outcomes (maternal and neonatal), too. In conclusion, in pregnant women serum levels of CRP can early recognize subjects at higher risk for maternal and neonatal complications needing a more stringent follow-up.

C-Reactive Protein Levels at the Midpregnancy Can Predict Gestational Complications

Vecchié, Alessandra;Bonaventura, Aldo;Carbone, Federico;Maggi, Davide;FERRAIOLO, ANTONELLA;Carloni, Beatrice;Andraghetti, Gabriella;Affinito Bonabello, Laura;Liberale, Luca;Dallegri, Franco;Montecucco, Fabrizio;Cordera, Renzo
2018

Abstract

Although essential for a successful pregnancy, a growing body of evidence suggests that maternal inflammation, when dysregulated, may represent a risk factor for both maternal and neonatal outcomes. Here, we assessed the accuracy of maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations at the middle phase of pregnancy in the identification of maternal adverse outcomes (MAO) until delivery. A correlation between CRP and a complicated pregnancy including both maternal and neonatal adverse outcomes has been investigated, too. In this retrospective study, conducted at the Diabetology Unit of IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa (Italy), 380 outpatient pregnant women have been enrolled at the prenatal visit before performing a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24th-26th gestational week for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening. Demographic, medical, and reproductive history has been obtained by verbal interview. Data about pregnancy and delivery have been retrieved from medical records. The median value of maternal baseline serum CRP was 3.25 μg/mL. Women experiencing MAO were older, more frequently suffering from hypertension, and showed higher CRP concentrations, with a cutoff value >1.86 μg/mL found by a ROC curve analysis to be accurately predictive for MAO. By a logistic regression analysis, serum CRP levels >1.86 μg/mL have been found to predict MAO also considering maternal age, hypertension, and GDM. Maternal CRP levels have been positively associated with overall pregnancy adverse outcomes (maternal and neonatal), too. In conclusion, in pregnant women serum levels of CRP can early recognize subjects at higher risk for maternal and neonatal complications needing a more stringent follow-up.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/933113
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