Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are used worldwide to assess water quality in coastal environments, but little is known about their genetic diversity and pathogenicity. This study examines the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, and genetic diversity of FIB isolated from marine sediments from a central Adriatic seaside resort. FIB, recovered from 6 out of 7 sites, were significantly more abundant at sampling stations 300 m offshore than close to the shore. Escherichia coli accounted for 34.5% of fecal coliforms, and Enterococcus faecalis accounted for 32% of enterococci. Most isolates (27% of E. coli and 22% of enterococci) were recovered from the sediments that had the highest organic content. Multidrug-resistant E. coli (31%) and enterococci (22%) were found at nearly all sites, whereas 34.5% of E. coli and 28% of enterococci harboring multiple virulence factors were recovered from just two sites. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing showed wide genetic diversity among isolates. Human epidemic clones (E. coli ST131 and Enterococcus faecium ST17) were identified for the first time by multilocus sequence typing in an area where bathing had not been prohibited. These clones were from sites far removed from riverine inputs, suggesting a wide diffusion of pathogenic FIB in the coastal environment and a high public health risk. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

Epidemic Escherichia coli ST131 and Enterococcus faecium ST17 in coastal marine sediments from an Italian beach

DI CESARE, ANDREA;BIAVASCO, FRANCESCA
2013-01-01

Abstract

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are used worldwide to assess water quality in coastal environments, but little is known about their genetic diversity and pathogenicity. This study examines the prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, and genetic diversity of FIB isolated from marine sediments from a central Adriatic seaside resort. FIB, recovered from 6 out of 7 sites, were significantly more abundant at sampling stations 300 m offshore than close to the shore. Escherichia coli accounted for 34.5% of fecal coliforms, and Enterococcus faecalis accounted for 32% of enterococci. Most isolates (27% of E. coli and 22% of enterococci) were recovered from the sediments that had the highest organic content. Multidrug-resistant E. coli (31%) and enterococci (22%) were found at nearly all sites, whereas 34.5% of E. coli and 28% of enterococci harboring multiple virulence factors were recovered from just two sites. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing showed wide genetic diversity among isolates. Human epidemic clones (E. coli ST131 and Enterococcus faecium ST17) were identified for the first time by multilocus sequence typing in an area where bathing had not been prohibited. These clones were from sites far removed from riverine inputs, suggesting a wide diffusion of pathogenic FIB in the coastal environment and a high public health risk. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/875867
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 13
  • Scopus 43
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 39
social impact