Mirror visual feedback (MVF) therapy has been applied to improve upper limb function in stroke. When combined with motor training, MVF improves the performance of the trained and untrained hand by enhancing the excitability of both primary motor cortices (M1s). Bradykinesia is a typical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by slowness in the execution of movement. This condition is often asymmetrical and possibly supported by a volitional hypoactivation of M1. MVF therapy could tentatively treat bradykinesia since the untrained hand, which benefits from the exercise, is generally more severely impaired in undertaking sequential movements. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether MVF therapy may improve bradykinesia of the more affected hand in PD patients. Twelve PD patients and twelve healthy controls performed for 10 minutes a finger sequence, receiving MVF of the more affected/nondominant hand. Before and after MVF training, participants performed a finger sequence at their spontaneous pace with both hands. M1 excitability was assessed in the trained and untrained hemispheres by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Movement speed increased after MVF training in either hand of both groups. MVF therapy enhanced cortical excitability of M1s in both groups. Our preliminary data support the use of MVF therapy to improve bradykinesia in PD patients.

Mirror visual feedback to improve bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease

BONASSI, GAIA;PELOSIN, ELISA;OGLIASTRO, CARLA;ABBRUZZESE, GIOVANNI;AVANZINO, LAURA
2016-01-01

Abstract

Mirror visual feedback (MVF) therapy has been applied to improve upper limb function in stroke. When combined with motor training, MVF improves the performance of the trained and untrained hand by enhancing the excitability of both primary motor cortices (M1s). Bradykinesia is a typical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by slowness in the execution of movement. This condition is often asymmetrical and possibly supported by a volitional hypoactivation of M1. MVF therapy could tentatively treat bradykinesia since the untrained hand, which benefits from the exercise, is generally more severely impaired in undertaking sequential movements. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether MVF therapy may improve bradykinesia of the more affected hand in PD patients. Twelve PD patients and twelve healthy controls performed for 10 minutes a finger sequence, receiving MVF of the more affected/nondominant hand. Before and after MVF training, participants performed a finger sequence at their spontaneous pace with both hands. M1 excitability was assessed in the trained and untrained hemispheres by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Movement speed increased after MVF training in either hand of both groups. MVF therapy enhanced cortical excitability of M1s in both groups. Our preliminary data support the use of MVF therapy to improve bradykinesia in PD patients.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/853445
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 5
  • Scopus 9
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 9
social impact