Within the framework of a regional research project on wetlands as cultural heritage sites, an attempt was made to examine the natural and anthropogenic causes driving the vegetation dynamics and exploitation of a small mountain wetland. To assess its potential use as an archive of the landscape history, an environmental archaeology approach was used: palaeoenvironmental data from traditional pollen sampling by coring were matched with stratigraphic information from an excavation area of several square metres, and plant micro- and macroremain analyses (e.g. pollen assemblages, micro- and macrocharcoal, morphological and dendrochronological features of waterlogged tree trunks) were compared in order to evaluate them as effects of different environmental factors and to pinpoint these factors. In this paper, the focus is set mainly on the results originating from pollen analyses of a core drilled in the peat-bog, a few metres from the stratigraphic excavation. The start of peat deposition, sometimes coinciding with human activity, was dated around 10,000 cal. BP. The impact on the vegetation surrounding the site is clearly recorded in the pollen assemblages only from the Roman period (2010–1820 cal. BP) even though a long history of human presence is archaeologically documented in the area since the Palaeolithic. Since that time, the abrupt decline of fir favoured the final spread of beech which, in turn, in the Middle Ages (1180–790 cal. BP) leaves space to grassland exploitable for pasture and for agro-silvi-pastoral activities. This site has proven to be of great importance for the Holocene history of the silver fir.

A palynological contribution to the environmental archaeology of a Mediterranean mountain wetland (North West Apennines, Italy).

GUIDO, MARIA ANGELA;MENOZZI, BRUNA ILDE;BELLINI, CRISTINA;PLACEREANI, SANDRA;MONTANARI, CARLO ALESSANDRO
2013

Abstract

Within the framework of a regional research project on wetlands as cultural heritage sites, an attempt was made to examine the natural and anthropogenic causes driving the vegetation dynamics and exploitation of a small mountain wetland. To assess its potential use as an archive of the landscape history, an environmental archaeology approach was used: palaeoenvironmental data from traditional pollen sampling by coring were matched with stratigraphic information from an excavation area of several square metres, and plant micro- and macroremain analyses (e.g. pollen assemblages, micro- and macrocharcoal, morphological and dendrochronological features of waterlogged tree trunks) were compared in order to evaluate them as effects of different environmental factors and to pinpoint these factors. In this paper, the focus is set mainly on the results originating from pollen analyses of a core drilled in the peat-bog, a few metres from the stratigraphic excavation. The start of peat deposition, sometimes coinciding with human activity, was dated around 10,000 cal. BP. The impact on the vegetation surrounding the site is clearly recorded in the pollen assemblages only from the Roman period (2010–1820 cal. BP) even though a long history of human presence is archaeologically documented in the area since the Palaeolithic. Since that time, the abrupt decline of fir favoured the final spread of beech which, in turn, in the Middle Ages (1180–790 cal. BP) leaves space to grassland exploitable for pasture and for agro-silvi-pastoral activities. This site has proven to be of great importance for the Holocene history of the silver fir.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/679766
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