Human behaviour analysis has important applications in the field of anomaly management, such as Intelligent Video Surveillance (IVS). As the number of individuals in a scene increases, however, new macroscopic complex behaviours emerge from the underlying interaction network among multiple agents. This phenomenon has lately been investigated by modelling such interaction through Social Forces. In most recent Intelligent Video Surveillance systems, mechanisms to support human decisions are integrated in cognitive artificial processes. These algorithms mainly address the problem of modelling behaviours to allow for inference and prediction over the environment. A bio-inspired structure is here proposed, which is able to encode and synthesize signals, not only for the description of single entities behaviours, but also for modelling cause-effect relationships between user actions and changes in environment configurations (i.e. the crowd). Such models are stored within a memory during a learning phase. Here the system operates an effective knowledge transfer from a human operator towards an automatic systems called Cognitive Surveillance Node (CSN), which is part of a complex cognitive JDL-based and bioinspired architecture. After such a knowledge-transfer phase, learned representations can be used, at different levels, either to support human decisions by detecting anomalous interaction models and thus compensating for human shortcomings, or, in an automatic decision scenario, to identify anomalous patterns and choose the best strategy to preserve stability of the entire system. Results are presented, where crowd behaviour is modelled by means of Social Forces and can interact with a human operator within a visual 3D simulator. The way anomalies are detected and consequently handled is demonstrated on synthetic data and also on a real video sequence, in both the user-support and automatic modes.

A bio-inspired knowledge representation method for anomaly detection in cognitive video surveillance systems

CHIAPPINO, SIMONE;MORERIO, PIETRO;MARCENARO, LUCIO;REGAZZONI, CARLO
2013

Abstract

Human behaviour analysis has important applications in the field of anomaly management, such as Intelligent Video Surveillance (IVS). As the number of individuals in a scene increases, however, new macroscopic complex behaviours emerge from the underlying interaction network among multiple agents. This phenomenon has lately been investigated by modelling such interaction through Social Forces. In most recent Intelligent Video Surveillance systems, mechanisms to support human decisions are integrated in cognitive artificial processes. These algorithms mainly address the problem of modelling behaviours to allow for inference and prediction over the environment. A bio-inspired structure is here proposed, which is able to encode and synthesize signals, not only for the description of single entities behaviours, but also for modelling cause-effect relationships between user actions and changes in environment configurations (i.e. the crowd). Such models are stored within a memory during a learning phase. Here the system operates an effective knowledge transfer from a human operator towards an automatic systems called Cognitive Surveillance Node (CSN), which is part of a complex cognitive JDL-based and bioinspired architecture. After such a knowledge-transfer phase, learned representations can be used, at different levels, either to support human decisions by detecting anomalous interaction models and thus compensating for human shortcomings, or, in an automatic decision scenario, to identify anomalous patterns and choose the best strategy to preserve stability of the entire system. Results are presented, where crowd behaviour is modelled by means of Social Forces and can interact with a human operator within a visual 3D simulator. The way anomalies are detected and consequently handled is demonstrated on synthetic data and also on a real video sequence, in both the user-support and automatic modes.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/625543
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact