Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is considered one of the main agents of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Recently, it has been proposed that memory deficits are caused by different stages of Abeta aggregation, particularly by oligomers. In addition, although memory impairment was found after Abeta administration in rodents and chicks, the nature of the memory deficits induced in invertebrates by acute administration of mammalian Abeta peptides is not well understood. Previously, we reported the amnesic effect of acute pre-training administration of naturally formed fibrils (NF) in crab memory. Here we evaluate the effect of NF and synthetic Abeta peptides administration at different times before and after training in this well characterized invertebrate memory model, the context-signal memory of the crab Chasmagnathus. We found a clear amnesic effect at very low doses of naturally Abeta NF only when administered immediately pre- and post-training, but not 24 h and 18 h before or 6h after training. Activation of ERK/MAPK (a protein kinase required for memory formation in this model) 60 min after administration was found. In contrast, neither JNK/SAPK nor NF-kappaB transcription factor were activated. Furthermore, synthetic Abeta1-42 and Abetapy3-42 administration induced amnesia when used after a protocol for fibrillation but not after a protocol for oligomerization. On the contrary, no amnestic effect was found when fibrillated Abeta1-40 and Abetapy11-42 peptides were used. Thus, Abeta1-42 and Abetapy3-42 peptides impaired memory and the effects were only found when highly aggregated peptides, which may include fibrils, protofibrils and oligomers, were administered. These temporally- and signaling-specific effects suggest that Abeta impairs memory by inducing transient physiological, rather than permanent neuropathological, alterations of the brain and this effect is achieved through generalized ERK activation.

Effect on memory of acute administration of naturally secreted fibrils and synthetic amyloid-beta peptides in an invertebrate model.

PICCINI, ALESSANDRA;
2008

Abstract

Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is considered one of the main agents of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Recently, it has been proposed that memory deficits are caused by different stages of Abeta aggregation, particularly by oligomers. In addition, although memory impairment was found after Abeta administration in rodents and chicks, the nature of the memory deficits induced in invertebrates by acute administration of mammalian Abeta peptides is not well understood. Previously, we reported the amnesic effect of acute pre-training administration of naturally formed fibrils (NF) in crab memory. Here we evaluate the effect of NF and synthetic Abeta peptides administration at different times before and after training in this well characterized invertebrate memory model, the context-signal memory of the crab Chasmagnathus. We found a clear amnesic effect at very low doses of naturally Abeta NF only when administered immediately pre- and post-training, but not 24 h and 18 h before or 6h after training. Activation of ERK/MAPK (a protein kinase required for memory formation in this model) 60 min after administration was found. In contrast, neither JNK/SAPK nor NF-kappaB transcription factor were activated. Furthermore, synthetic Abeta1-42 and Abetapy3-42 administration induced amnesia when used after a protocol for fibrillation but not after a protocol for oligomerization. On the contrary, no amnestic effect was found when fibrillated Abeta1-40 and Abetapy11-42 peptides were used. Thus, Abeta1-42 and Abetapy3-42 peptides impaired memory and the effects were only found when highly aggregated peptides, which may include fibrils, protofibrils and oligomers, were administered. These temporally- and signaling-specific effects suggest that Abeta impairs memory by inducing transient physiological, rather than permanent neuropathological, alterations of the brain and this effect is achieved through generalized ERK activation.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/491123
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact