We investigated the halogen (Cl, F, Br, and I) chemistry of serpentinites that record progressive dehydration during subduction from shallow oceanic environments via increased pressure and temperature conditions to complete breakdown of antigorite. The aim is to evaluate the relevance of serpentinites for halogen recycling in subduction zones and for deep mantle recharge of these elements. The halogen compositions of the analyzed samples indicate input from seawater and sedimentary sources during initial serpentinization of either subducting lithospheric mantle during slab bending or forearc mantle by uprising slab fluids. During the first dehydration stage (antigorite+brucite→olivine+H2O), fluids with high Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios are released resulting in residual serpentinites with lower Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios. Veins associated with this event and with the final antigorite breakdown (antigorite→olivine+orthopyroxene+H2O) show higher halogen ratios compared to their adjacent wall rocks, and they are similar to those found in arc volcanoes (F/Cl and I/Cl between ca. 0.083-1.5, and ca. 0.00038-0.0013, respectively). All measured deserpentinization samples show a narrow range in δ37Cl values (between -0.42‰ and +0.92‰) overlapping the δ37Cl values of seafloor serpentinites and confirming that no significant Cl isotope fractionation occurs during subduction dehydration of serpentinites. Our findings document the conservative behavior of halogens during subduction. Mass balance constraints reveal that serpentinites strongly control the halogen chemistry of deep subduction zone fluids and that descent of rock residues after deserpentinization strongly affects the halogen budget of the mantle.

Dehydration of subducting serpentinite: Implications for halogen mobility in subduction zones and the deep halogen cycle

SCAMBELLURI, MARCO;
2011

Abstract

We investigated the halogen (Cl, F, Br, and I) chemistry of serpentinites that record progressive dehydration during subduction from shallow oceanic environments via increased pressure and temperature conditions to complete breakdown of antigorite. The aim is to evaluate the relevance of serpentinites for halogen recycling in subduction zones and for deep mantle recharge of these elements. The halogen compositions of the analyzed samples indicate input from seawater and sedimentary sources during initial serpentinization of either subducting lithospheric mantle during slab bending or forearc mantle by uprising slab fluids. During the first dehydration stage (antigorite+brucite→olivine+H2O), fluids with high Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios are released resulting in residual serpentinites with lower Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios. Veins associated with this event and with the final antigorite breakdown (antigorite→olivine+orthopyroxene+H2O) show higher halogen ratios compared to their adjacent wall rocks, and they are similar to those found in arc volcanoes (F/Cl and I/Cl between ca. 0.083-1.5, and ca. 0.00038-0.0013, respectively). All measured deserpentinization samples show a narrow range in δ37Cl values (between -0.42‰ and +0.92‰) overlapping the δ37Cl values of seafloor serpentinites and confirming that no significant Cl isotope fractionation occurs during subduction dehydration of serpentinites. Our findings document the conservative behavior of halogens during subduction. Mass balance constraints reveal that serpentinites strongly control the halogen chemistry of deep subduction zone fluids and that descent of rock residues after deserpentinization strongly affects the halogen budget of the mantle.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/275998
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