Objective Arterial stiffness is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality in the general population as well as in hypertension and end-stage renal disease. We investigated the relationship between a recently proposed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived index of arterial stiffness and early signs of renal damage in patients with primary hypertension. Design and setting A total of 168 untreated patients with sustained primary hypertension were studied. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was calculated based on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure readings. Albuminuria was measured as the albumin to creatinine ratio. Creatinine clearance was estimated using the Cockcroft–Gault formula, and the interlobar resistive index was evaluated by renal ultrasound and Doppler examination. Results AASI was positively related to urinary albumin excretion and resistive index, and was negatively related to estimated creatinine clearance and renal volume to the resistive index ratio. Patients with AASI above the median (i.e. > 0.51) showed a higher prevalence of microalbuminuria and a mild reduction in creatinine clearance. Moreover, patients with microalbuminuria or a mild reduction in creatinine clearance had significantly higher AASI values compared with those without, and the greater the renal involvement, the greater the AASI. After adjusting for several potentially confounding variables, we found that each standard deviation increase in AASI (i.e. 0.16) entails an almost twofold greater risk of renal involvement. Conclusion Increased AASI is independently associated with early signs of renal damage in patients with sustained primary hypertension. These results strengthen the usefulness of AASI and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in cardiovascular risk assessment. J Hypertens 24:2033–2038 Q 2006

Ambulatory arterial stiffness index and renal abnormalities in primary hypertension

LEONCINI, GIOVANNA;VIAZZI, FRANCESCA CHIARA;DEFERRARI, GIACOMO;PONTREMOLI, ROBERTO
2006

Abstract

Objective Arterial stiffness is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality in the general population as well as in hypertension and end-stage renal disease. We investigated the relationship between a recently proposed ambulatory blood pressure monitoring-derived index of arterial stiffness and early signs of renal damage in patients with primary hypertension. Design and setting A total of 168 untreated patients with sustained primary hypertension were studied. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) was calculated based on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure readings. Albuminuria was measured as the albumin to creatinine ratio. Creatinine clearance was estimated using the Cockcroft–Gault formula, and the interlobar resistive index was evaluated by renal ultrasound and Doppler examination. Results AASI was positively related to urinary albumin excretion and resistive index, and was negatively related to estimated creatinine clearance and renal volume to the resistive index ratio. Patients with AASI above the median (i.e. > 0.51) showed a higher prevalence of microalbuminuria and a mild reduction in creatinine clearance. Moreover, patients with microalbuminuria or a mild reduction in creatinine clearance had significantly higher AASI values compared with those without, and the greater the renal involvement, the greater the AASI. After adjusting for several potentially confounding variables, we found that each standard deviation increase in AASI (i.e. 0.16) entails an almost twofold greater risk of renal involvement. Conclusion Increased AASI is independently associated with early signs of renal damage in patients with sustained primary hypertension. These results strengthen the usefulness of AASI and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in cardiovascular risk assessment. J Hypertens 24:2033–2038 Q 2006
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2006 JH AASI and the kidney.pdf

accesso chiuso

Tipologia: Documento in versione editoriale
Dimensione 149.07 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
149.07 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/267445
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 12
  • Scopus 74
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 77
social impact