The airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens poses a significant challenge to public health, especially with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. This study investigated environmental factors influencing the survival of airborne bacteria, focusing on the effects of different carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and dust concentrations. The experiments were conducted in an atmospheric simulation chamber using the non-resistant wild-type E. coli K12 (JM109) and a multi-resistant variant (JM109-pEC958). Different CO2 (100 ppm, 800 ppm, 3000 ppm) and dust concentrations (250 µg m−3 , 500 µg m−3 , 2000 µg m−3 ) were tested to encompass a wide range of CO2 and dust levels. The results revealed that JM109-pEC958 exhibited greater resilience to high CO2 and dust concentrations compared to its non-resistant counterpart. At 3000 ppm CO2 , the survival rate of JM109 was significantly reduced, while the survival rate of JM109-pEC958 remained unaffected. At the dust concentration of 250 µg m−3 , JM109 exhibited significantly reduced survival, whereas JM109-pEC958 did not. When the dust concentration was increased to 500 and 2000 µg m−3 , even the JM109-pEC958 experienced substantially reduced survival rates, which were still significantly higher than those of its non-resistant counterpart at these concentrations. These findings suggest that multi-resistant E. coli strains possess mechanisms enabling them to endure extreme environmental conditions better than non-resistant strains, potentially involving regulatory genes or efflux pumps. The study underscores the importance of understanding bacterial adaptation strategies to develop effective mitigation approaches against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in atmospheric environments. Overall, this study provides valuable insights into the interplay between environmental stressors and bacterial survival, serving as a foundational step towards elucidating the adaptation mechanisms of multi-resistant bacteria and informing strategies for combating antibiotic resistance in the atmosphere

Influence of CO2 and Dust on the Survival of Non-Resistant and Multi-Resistant Airborne E. coli Strains

Elena Abd El;Silvia Giulia Danelli;Elena Gatta;Dario Massabo;Federico Mazzei;Paolo Prati;Virginia Vernocchi;Jing Wang
2024-01-01

Abstract

The airborne transmission of bacterial pathogens poses a significant challenge to public health, especially with the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. This study investigated environmental factors influencing the survival of airborne bacteria, focusing on the effects of different carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and dust concentrations. The experiments were conducted in an atmospheric simulation chamber using the non-resistant wild-type E. coli K12 (JM109) and a multi-resistant variant (JM109-pEC958). Different CO2 (100 ppm, 800 ppm, 3000 ppm) and dust concentrations (250 µg m−3 , 500 µg m−3 , 2000 µg m−3 ) were tested to encompass a wide range of CO2 and dust levels. The results revealed that JM109-pEC958 exhibited greater resilience to high CO2 and dust concentrations compared to its non-resistant counterpart. At 3000 ppm CO2 , the survival rate of JM109 was significantly reduced, while the survival rate of JM109-pEC958 remained unaffected. At the dust concentration of 250 µg m−3 , JM109 exhibited significantly reduced survival, whereas JM109-pEC958 did not. When the dust concentration was increased to 500 and 2000 µg m−3 , even the JM109-pEC958 experienced substantially reduced survival rates, which were still significantly higher than those of its non-resistant counterpart at these concentrations. These findings suggest that multi-resistant E. coli strains possess mechanisms enabling them to endure extreme environmental conditions better than non-resistant strains, potentially involving regulatory genes or efflux pumps. The study underscores the importance of understanding bacterial adaptation strategies to develop effective mitigation approaches against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in atmospheric environments. Overall, this study provides valuable insights into the interplay between environmental stressors and bacterial survival, serving as a foundational step towards elucidating the adaptation mechanisms of multi-resistant bacteria and informing strategies for combating antibiotic resistance in the atmosphere
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1182435
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