Background: Inflammation and immunological alterations, such as T-cell and cytokine changes, are implicated in bipolar disorder (BD), with some evidence linking them to brain structural changes (e.g., cortical thickness (CT), gray matter (GM) volume and white matter (WM) microstructure). However, the connection between specific peripheral cell types, such as T-cells, and neuroimaging in BD remains scarcely investigated. Aims of the study: This study aims to explore the link between T-cell immunophenotype and neuroradiological findings in BD. Methods: Our study investigated 43 type I BD subjects (22 depressive, 21 manic) and 26 healthy controls (HC), analyzing T lymphocyte immunophenotype and employing neuroimaging to assess CT for GM and fractional anisotropy (FA) for WM. Results: In lymphocyte populations, BD patients exhibited elevated CD4+ and CD4+ central memory (TCM) cells frequencies, but lower CD8+ effector memory (TEM) and terminal effector memory (TTEM) cells. Neuroimaging analysis revealed reduced CT in multiple brain regions in BD patients; and significant negative correlations between CD4 + TCM levels and CT of precuneus and fusiform gyrus. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis showed widespread alteration in WM microstructure in BD patients, with negative and positive correlations respectively between FA and radial diffusivity (RD) and CD4 + TCM. Additionally, positive and negative correlations were found respectively between FA and RD and the CD8 + TEM and CD8 + TTEM subsets. Conclusions: Our research revealed distinct T lymphocyte changes and brain structure alterations in BD, underscoring possible immune-brain interactions, warranting further study and therapeutic exploration.

T-cell immunophenotype correlations with cortical thickness and white matter microstructure in bipolar disorder

Escelsior, Andrea;Inuggi, Alberto;Sterlini, Bruno;Bovio, Anna;Marenco, Giacomo;Bode, Juxhin;Favilla, Luca;Tardito, Samuele;Altosole, Tiziana;Pereira da Silva, Beatriz;Fenoglio, Daniela;Filaci, Gilberto;Amore, Mario;Serafini, Gianluca
2024-01-01

Abstract

Background: Inflammation and immunological alterations, such as T-cell and cytokine changes, are implicated in bipolar disorder (BD), with some evidence linking them to brain structural changes (e.g., cortical thickness (CT), gray matter (GM) volume and white matter (WM) microstructure). However, the connection between specific peripheral cell types, such as T-cells, and neuroimaging in BD remains scarcely investigated. Aims of the study: This study aims to explore the link between T-cell immunophenotype and neuroradiological findings in BD. Methods: Our study investigated 43 type I BD subjects (22 depressive, 21 manic) and 26 healthy controls (HC), analyzing T lymphocyte immunophenotype and employing neuroimaging to assess CT for GM and fractional anisotropy (FA) for WM. Results: In lymphocyte populations, BD patients exhibited elevated CD4+ and CD4+ central memory (TCM) cells frequencies, but lower CD8+ effector memory (TEM) and terminal effector memory (TTEM) cells. Neuroimaging analysis revealed reduced CT in multiple brain regions in BD patients; and significant negative correlations between CD4 + TCM levels and CT of precuneus and fusiform gyrus. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis showed widespread alteration in WM microstructure in BD patients, with negative and positive correlations respectively between FA and radial diffusivity (RD) and CD4 + TCM. Additionally, positive and negative correlations were found respectively between FA and RD and the CD8 + TEM and CD8 + TTEM subsets. Conclusions: Our research revealed distinct T lymphocyte changes and brain structure alterations in BD, underscoring possible immune-brain interactions, warranting further study and therapeutic exploration.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1169776
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