Aims: Despite advances in pharmacotherapy and device innovation, in-stent restenosis (ISR) and stent thrombosis (ST) remain serious complications following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure with stent implantation. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is an enzyme involved in plasma cholesterol homeostasis and recently emerged as a therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. Antibody-based PCSK9 inhibition is increasingly used in different subsets of patients, including those undergoing PCI. However, whether PCSK9 inhibition affects outcome after stent implantation remains unknown. Methods and results: 12 to 14 weeks old C57Bl/6 mice underwent carotid artery bare-metal stent implantation. Compared to sham intervention, stent implantation was associated with increased expression of several inflammatory mediators, including PCSK9. The increase in PCSK9 protein expression was confirmed in the stented vascular tissue, but not in plasma. To inhibit PCSK9, alirocumab was administered weekly to mice before stent implantation. After 6 weeks, histological examination revealed increased intimal hyperplasia in the stented segment of alirocumab-treated animals compared to controls. In vitro, alirocumab promoted migration and inhibited the onset of senescence in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Conversely, it blunted the migration and increased the senescence of endothelial cells (EC). Conclusion: Antibody-based PCSK9 inhibition promotes in-stent intimal hyperplasia and blunts vascular healing by increasing VSMC migration, while reducing that of EC. This effect is likely mediated, at least in part, by a differential effect on VSMC and EC senescence. The herein-reported data warrant additional investigations concerning the use of PCSK9 inhibitors in patients undergoing PCI with stent implantation.

Antibody-mediated PCSK9 neutralization worsens outcome after bare-metal stent implantation in mice

Liberale, Luca;Montecucco, Fabrizio;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Aims: Despite advances in pharmacotherapy and device innovation, in-stent restenosis (ISR) and stent thrombosis (ST) remain serious complications following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedure with stent implantation. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is an enzyme involved in plasma cholesterol homeostasis and recently emerged as a therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. Antibody-based PCSK9 inhibition is increasingly used in different subsets of patients, including those undergoing PCI. However, whether PCSK9 inhibition affects outcome after stent implantation remains unknown. Methods and results: 12 to 14 weeks old C57Bl/6 mice underwent carotid artery bare-metal stent implantation. Compared to sham intervention, stent implantation was associated with increased expression of several inflammatory mediators, including PCSK9. The increase in PCSK9 protein expression was confirmed in the stented vascular tissue, but not in plasma. To inhibit PCSK9, alirocumab was administered weekly to mice before stent implantation. After 6 weeks, histological examination revealed increased intimal hyperplasia in the stented segment of alirocumab-treated animals compared to controls. In vitro, alirocumab promoted migration and inhibited the onset of senescence in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Conversely, it blunted the migration and increased the senescence of endothelial cells (EC). Conclusion: Antibody-based PCSK9 inhibition promotes in-stent intimal hyperplasia and blunts vascular healing by increasing VSMC migration, while reducing that of EC. This effect is likely mediated, at least in part, by a differential effect on VSMC and EC senescence. The herein-reported data warrant additional investigations concerning the use of PCSK9 inhibitors in patients undergoing PCI with stent implantation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1146617
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