Purpose: To investigate the relationship of field-derived power and physical performance parameters with competition success in road cycling climbing specialists of age-related categories and to explore cross-sectional differences between high-ranked (HIGHR) climbing specialists of each category. Methods: Fifty-three male climbers participated in this study (junior [JUN], n = 15; under 23 [U23], n = 21; professional [PRO], n = 17). Training and racing data collected during the 2016-19 competitive seasons were retrospectively analyzed for record power outputs (RPOs) and RPOs after prior accumulated work. Results: In JUN, body mass, absolute RPOs, and relative RPOs were higher in HIGHR compared with low ranked (d = 0.97-2.20, large; P =.097-.001); in U23 and PRO, the percentage decrease in RPOs after 20, 30, 40, and 50 kJ.kg(-1) was less in HIGHR compared with low ranked (d = 0.77-1.74, moderate-large; P =.096-.004). JUN HIGHR presented lower absolute and relative RPO20 min (eta(2)(p) =.34 -.38, large; P =.099-.001) and higher percentage decrease in RPOs after prior accumulated work compared with U23 and PRO HIGHR (eta(2)(p) =.28 -.68, large; P =.060-.001); percentage decrease in RPOs after prior accumulated work was the only parameter differentiating U23 and PRO HIGHR, with PRO declining less in relative RPO-1 min, RPO-5 min, and RPO-20 min after 20 to 50 kJ.kg(-1) (eta(2)(p) =.28 -.68, large; P =.090-.001). Conclusions: Superior absolute and relative RPOs characterize HIGHR JUN climbing specialists. Superior fatigue resistance differentiates HIGHR U23 and PRO climbers compared with low ranked, as well as PRO versus U23 climbers.

Power Road-Derived Physical Performance Parameters in Junior, Under-23, and Professional Road Cycling Climbers

Gallo, Gabriele;Faelli, Emanuela;Ruggeri, Piero;Filipas, Luca
2022-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the relationship of field-derived power and physical performance parameters with competition success in road cycling climbing specialists of age-related categories and to explore cross-sectional differences between high-ranked (HIGHR) climbing specialists of each category. Methods: Fifty-three male climbers participated in this study (junior [JUN], n = 15; under 23 [U23], n = 21; professional [PRO], n = 17). Training and racing data collected during the 2016-19 competitive seasons were retrospectively analyzed for record power outputs (RPOs) and RPOs after prior accumulated work. Results: In JUN, body mass, absolute RPOs, and relative RPOs were higher in HIGHR compared with low ranked (d = 0.97-2.20, large; P =.097-.001); in U23 and PRO, the percentage decrease in RPOs after 20, 30, 40, and 50 kJ.kg(-1) was less in HIGHR compared with low ranked (d = 0.77-1.74, moderate-large; P =.096-.004). JUN HIGHR presented lower absolute and relative RPO20 min (eta(2)(p) =.34 -.38, large; P =.099-.001) and higher percentage decrease in RPOs after prior accumulated work compared with U23 and PRO HIGHR (eta(2)(p) =.28 -.68, large; P =.060-.001); percentage decrease in RPOs after prior accumulated work was the only parameter differentiating U23 and PRO HIGHR, with PRO declining less in relative RPO-1 min, RPO-5 min, and RPO-20 min after 20 to 50 kJ.kg(-1) (eta(2)(p) =.28 -.68, large; P =.090-.001). Conclusions: Superior absolute and relative RPOs characterize HIGHR JUN climbing specialists. Superior fatigue resistance differentiates HIGHR U23 and PRO climbers compared with low ranked, as well as PRO versus U23 climbers.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1103255
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