ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to compare the long-term outcomes of implants placed in patients treated for periodontitis periodontally compromised patients (PCP) and in periodontally healthy patients (PHP) in relation to adhesion to supportive periodontal therapy (SPT).Material and methodsOne hundred and twelve partially edentulous patients were consecutively enrolled in private specialist practice and divided into three groups according to their initial periodontal condition: PHP, moderate PCP and severe PCP. Perio and implant treatment was carried out as needed. Solid screws (S), hollow screws (HS) and hollow cylinders (HC) were installed to support fixed prostheses, after successful completion of initial periodontal therapy (full-mouth plaque score < 25% and full-mouth bleeding score < 25%). At the end of treatment, patients were asked to follow an individualized SPT program. At 10 years, clinical measures and radiographic bone changes were recorded by two calibrated operators, blinded to the initial patient classification.ResultsEleven patients were lost to follow-up. During the period of observation, 18 implants were removed because of biological complications. The implant survival rate was 96.6%, 92.8% and 90% for all implants and 98%, 94.2% and 90% for S-implants only, respectively, for PHP, moderate PCP and severe PCP. The mean bone loss was 0.75 (+/- 0.88) mm in PHP, 1.14 (+/- 1.11) mm in moderate PCP and 0.98 (+/- 1.22) mm in severe PCP, without any statistically significant difference. The percentage of sites, with bone loss >= 3 mm, was, respectively, 4.7% for PHP, 11.2% for moderate PCP and 15.1% for severe PCP, with a statistically significant difference between PHP and severe PCP (P < 0.05). Lack of adhesion to SPT was correlated with a higher incidence of bone loss and implant loss.ConclusionPatients with a history of periodontitis presented a lower survival rate and a statistically significantly higher number of sites with peri-implant bone loss. Furtheremore, PCP, who did not completely adhere to the SPT, were found to present a higher implant failure rate. This underlines the value of the SPT in enhancing the long-term outcomes of implant therapy, particularly in subjects affected by periodontitis, in order to control reinfection and limit biological complications.To cite this article:Roccuzzo M, De Angelis N, Bonino L, Aglietta M. Ten-year results of a three arms prospective cohort study on implants in periodontally compromised patients. Part 1: implant loss and radiographic bone loss.Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 21, 2010; 490-496.doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2009.01886.x.

Ten-year results of a three-arm prospective cohort study on implants in periodontally compromised patients. Part 1: Implant loss and radiographic bone loss

De Angelis, N.;Aglietta, M.
2010-01-01

Abstract

ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to compare the long-term outcomes of implants placed in patients treated for periodontitis periodontally compromised patients (PCP) and in periodontally healthy patients (PHP) in relation to adhesion to supportive periodontal therapy (SPT).Material and methodsOne hundred and twelve partially edentulous patients were consecutively enrolled in private specialist practice and divided into three groups according to their initial periodontal condition: PHP, moderate PCP and severe PCP. Perio and implant treatment was carried out as needed. Solid screws (S), hollow screws (HS) and hollow cylinders (HC) were installed to support fixed prostheses, after successful completion of initial periodontal therapy (full-mouth plaque score < 25% and full-mouth bleeding score < 25%). At the end of treatment, patients were asked to follow an individualized SPT program. At 10 years, clinical measures and radiographic bone changes were recorded by two calibrated operators, blinded to the initial patient classification.ResultsEleven patients were lost to follow-up. During the period of observation, 18 implants were removed because of biological complications. The implant survival rate was 96.6%, 92.8% and 90% for all implants and 98%, 94.2% and 90% for S-implants only, respectively, for PHP, moderate PCP and severe PCP. The mean bone loss was 0.75 (+/- 0.88) mm in PHP, 1.14 (+/- 1.11) mm in moderate PCP and 0.98 (+/- 1.22) mm in severe PCP, without any statistically significant difference. The percentage of sites, with bone loss >= 3 mm, was, respectively, 4.7% for PHP, 11.2% for moderate PCP and 15.1% for severe PCP, with a statistically significant difference between PHP and severe PCP (P < 0.05). Lack of adhesion to SPT was correlated with a higher incidence of bone loss and implant loss.ConclusionPatients with a history of periodontitis presented a lower survival rate and a statistically significantly higher number of sites with peri-implant bone loss. Furtheremore, PCP, who did not completely adhere to the SPT, were found to present a higher implant failure rate. This underlines the value of the SPT in enhancing the long-term outcomes of implant therapy, particularly in subjects affected by periodontitis, in order to control reinfection and limit biological complications.To cite this article:Roccuzzo M, De Angelis N, Bonino L, Aglietta M. Ten-year results of a three arms prospective cohort study on implants in periodontally compromised patients. Part 1: implant loss and radiographic bone loss.Clin. Oral Impl. Res. 21, 2010; 490-496.doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0501.2009.01886.x.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1102924
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