Serum beta-D-glucan (BDG) determination plays an important role in the diagnosis of candidemia among critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). However, BDG levels measured may be lower in the case of infections caused by some non-albicans species, such as C. parapsilosis and C. auris. The aim of this single-center study was to investigate the sensitivity of serum BDG for the diagnosis of candidemia stratified according to causative Candida species in ICU patients. This was a single-center, retrospective study, including all adult patients admitted to ICU during the period 2018-2021. All episodes of candidemia with a determination of BDG available within 3 days before or after positive blood culture were recorded. The preplanned primary objective was to investigate the sensitivity of serum BDG to detect candidemia early and the effect of different Candida species. The secondary objective was to measure serum BDG in patients with candidemia from different Candida species. In total, 146 candidemia episodes in 118 patients were analyzed. Median BDG value for C. albicans candidemia (182 pg/mL) was higher than that observed for C. parapsilosis (78 pg/mL, p = 0.015) and C. auris (48 pg/mL, p = 0.022). The overall sensitivity of BDG for the diagnosis of candidemia was low (47%, 95% CI 39-55%). In conclusion, in critically ill patients admitted to ICU, serum BDG levels for candidemia were different among species, with lower levels confirmed for C. parapsilosis and C. auris. Serum BDG sensitivity for early detection of candidemia was lower than previously reported in other ICU populations.

Sensitivity of Serum Beta-D-Glucan in Candidemia According to Candida Species Epidemiology in Critically Ill Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

Mikulska M.;Magnasco L.;Signori A.;Sepulcri C.;Dettori S.;Tutino S.;Vena A.;Miletich F.;Ullah N.;Ball L.;Pelosi P.;Giacobbe D. R.;Bassetti M.
2022-01-01

Abstract

Serum beta-D-glucan (BDG) determination plays an important role in the diagnosis of candidemia among critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). However, BDG levels measured may be lower in the case of infections caused by some non-albicans species, such as C. parapsilosis and C. auris. The aim of this single-center study was to investigate the sensitivity of serum BDG for the diagnosis of candidemia stratified according to causative Candida species in ICU patients. This was a single-center, retrospective study, including all adult patients admitted to ICU during the period 2018-2021. All episodes of candidemia with a determination of BDG available within 3 days before or after positive blood culture were recorded. The preplanned primary objective was to investigate the sensitivity of serum BDG to detect candidemia early and the effect of different Candida species. The secondary objective was to measure serum BDG in patients with candidemia from different Candida species. In total, 146 candidemia episodes in 118 patients were analyzed. Median BDG value for C. albicans candidemia (182 pg/mL) was higher than that observed for C. parapsilosis (78 pg/mL, p = 0.015) and C. auris (48 pg/mL, p = 0.022). The overall sensitivity of BDG for the diagnosis of candidemia was low (47%, 95% CI 39-55%). In conclusion, in critically ill patients admitted to ICU, serum BDG levels for candidemia were different among species, with lower levels confirmed for C. parapsilosis and C. auris. Serum BDG sensitivity for early detection of candidemia was lower than previously reported in other ICU populations.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1098385
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