Purpose: To study the dimensions and distribution of human vitreous collagen type II fragments collected after vitrectomy performed at varying cut rates and to evaluate if increasing the cut rate produces smaller collagen fragments, thus reducing retinal traction and/or viscosity. Methods: Fluid was collected during core vitrectomies performed for macular surgery at cut rates from 1000 to 16,000 cuts per minute (CPM) and immediately refrigerated. Protein fractions were separated by molecular weight (MW; >100 kDa, 50-100 kDa, 50-30 kDa, 30-10 kDa, and <10 kDa) through centrifugal filters. The Human Collagen II ELISA Kit colorimetric assay was then used to measure the COL2A1 in unfiltered and filtered samples. Results: Vitreous samples collected after vitrectomy performed at 16,000 CPM contained a higher concentration of protein with MW over 100 kDa than at any other cutting frequency (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found in fractions collected with a MW between 50 and 100 kDa. Collagen type II fragments over 100 kDa were significantly more represented than smaller fragments at each cut rate. The proportion of smaller (50-100 kDa) collagen fragments compared with those over 100 kDa was higher at 2000 CPM than at higher cut rates. Conclusions: Vitreous samples collected at different cut rates do not contain a significantly different proportion of collagen type II fragments of the tested MW. The extreme variability of vitreous flow through the cutter port may explain the uncertain predictability of collagen fragment MWs. Translational relevance: Increasing the cut rate does not produce vitreous fragments of proportionally smaller dimension. It is necessary to achieve an invariant instantaneous flow through the cutter port in order to decrease retinal traction during vitrectomy.

Human Vitreous Collagen Fragments Dimension As a Function of Vitrectomy Cut Rate

Rossi, Tommaso;Speciale, Andrea;Izzotti, Alberto;Trillo, Carlandrea;Telani, Serena;
2022

Abstract

Purpose: To study the dimensions and distribution of human vitreous collagen type II fragments collected after vitrectomy performed at varying cut rates and to evaluate if increasing the cut rate produces smaller collagen fragments, thus reducing retinal traction and/or viscosity. Methods: Fluid was collected during core vitrectomies performed for macular surgery at cut rates from 1000 to 16,000 cuts per minute (CPM) and immediately refrigerated. Protein fractions were separated by molecular weight (MW; >100 kDa, 50-100 kDa, 50-30 kDa, 30-10 kDa, and <10 kDa) through centrifugal filters. The Human Collagen II ELISA Kit colorimetric assay was then used to measure the COL2A1 in unfiltered and filtered samples. Results: Vitreous samples collected after vitrectomy performed at 16,000 CPM contained a higher concentration of protein with MW over 100 kDa than at any other cutting frequency (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found in fractions collected with a MW between 50 and 100 kDa. Collagen type II fragments over 100 kDa were significantly more represented than smaller fragments at each cut rate. The proportion of smaller (50-100 kDa) collagen fragments compared with those over 100 kDa was higher at 2000 CPM than at higher cut rates. Conclusions: Vitreous samples collected at different cut rates do not contain a significantly different proportion of collagen type II fragments of the tested MW. The extreme variability of vitreous flow through the cutter port may explain the uncertain predictability of collagen fragment MWs. Translational relevance: Increasing the cut rate does not produce vitreous fragments of proportionally smaller dimension. It is necessary to achieve an invariant instantaneous flow through the cutter port in order to decrease retinal traction during vitrectomy.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1077695
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