As our understanding of volitional motor function increases, it is clear that complex movements are the result of the interactions of multiple cortical regions rather than just the output properties of primary motor cortex. However, our understanding of the interactions among these regions is limited. In this study, we used the activity-dependent stimulation (ADS) technique to determine the short/long-term effects on network activity and neuroplasticity of intracortical connections. ADS uses the intrinsic neural activity of one region to trigger stimulations in a separate region of the brain and can manipulate neuronal connectivity in vivo. Our aim was to compare single-unit neuronal activity within premotor cortex (rostral forelimb area, [RFA] in rats) in response to ADS (triggered from RFA) and randomly-generated stimulation in the somatosensory area (S1) within single sessions and across 21 consecutive days of stimulation.We examined firing rate and correlation between spikes and stimuli in chronically-implanted healthy ambulatory rats during spontaneous and evoked activity. At the end of the treatment, we evaluated changes of synaptophysin expression. Our results demonstrated the ability of ADS to modulate RFA firing properties and to promote synaptogenesis in S1, strengthening the idea that this Hebbian-inspired protocol can be used to modulate cortical connectivity.

Entrainment of network activity by closed-loop microstimulation in healthy ambulatory rats

Averna A.;Barban F.;Buccelli S.;Chiappalone M.;
2021

Abstract

As our understanding of volitional motor function increases, it is clear that complex movements are the result of the interactions of multiple cortical regions rather than just the output properties of primary motor cortex. However, our understanding of the interactions among these regions is limited. In this study, we used the activity-dependent stimulation (ADS) technique to determine the short/long-term effects on network activity and neuroplasticity of intracortical connections. ADS uses the intrinsic neural activity of one region to trigger stimulations in a separate region of the brain and can manipulate neuronal connectivity in vivo. Our aim was to compare single-unit neuronal activity within premotor cortex (rostral forelimb area, [RFA] in rats) in response to ADS (triggered from RFA) and randomly-generated stimulation in the somatosensory area (S1) within single sessions and across 21 consecutive days of stimulation.We examined firing rate and correlation between spikes and stimuli in chronically-implanted healthy ambulatory rats during spontaneous and evoked activity. At the end of the treatment, we evaluated changes of synaptophysin expression. Our results demonstrated the ability of ADS to modulate RFA firing properties and to promote synaptogenesis in S1, strengthening the idea that this Hebbian-inspired protocol can be used to modulate cortical connectivity.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1077492
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