The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor (CCCM) is a valuable tool to measure and com-pare European cities’ cultural and creative vitality. It addresses three dimensions: the presence of cultural venues and facilities (i.e., Cultural Vibrancy); the jobs and innovations connected to the so-called creative industries (i.e., the Creative Economy); and the enabling conditions for culture and creativity diffusion: human capital, diversity, trust and openness, international accessibility, and connectivity (i.e., an Enabling Environment). Comparing and ranking cities on these different dimensions offer policymakers the possibility of developing strategies related to their development (Montalto et al., 2019). However, as is recognized in the report presenting the CCCM, significant methodological limitations exist. They are related to both the tool and the potential behavioral implications it generates (JRC‐OECD Handbook, 2008) and to the difficulties with addressing a multi-faceted phenomenon with scant data, which offer limited opportunities to adequately measure cultural and creative cities (Van Puyenbroeck et al., 2021). In this paper, we integrate the CCCM framework to propose a spatially contextualized application at the city level as a tool to support policy-makers’ understanding of the potential role of cultural and creative organizations in city development (Soini and Dessein, 2016). We, therefore, build our arguments on a recent stream of research showing the importance of the spatial dimension to understand the relevance of cultural and creative industries within a context and inform decision‐makers (Boal‐San Miguel and Herrero‐Prieto, 2020). This spatial dimension is even more important at the city level, where public, private, and non‐profit organizations interact to execute culture‐led policies (Bonet and Négrier, 2018). In this case, the location of specific organizations may be critical in offering opportunities at the neighborhood level, paving the way to space‐driven local level policies (e.g., the 15 min walking strategy; see e.g., Pisano, 2020).

Bringing back in the spatial dimension in the assessment of cultural and creative industries and its relationship with a city’s sustainability: The case of milan

Monti A.
2021

Abstract

The Cultural and Creative Cities Monitor (CCCM) is a valuable tool to measure and com-pare European cities’ cultural and creative vitality. It addresses three dimensions: the presence of cultural venues and facilities (i.e., Cultural Vibrancy); the jobs and innovations connected to the so-called creative industries (i.e., the Creative Economy); and the enabling conditions for culture and creativity diffusion: human capital, diversity, trust and openness, international accessibility, and connectivity (i.e., an Enabling Environment). Comparing and ranking cities on these different dimensions offer policymakers the possibility of developing strategies related to their development (Montalto et al., 2019). However, as is recognized in the report presenting the CCCM, significant methodological limitations exist. They are related to both the tool and the potential behavioral implications it generates (JRC‐OECD Handbook, 2008) and to the difficulties with addressing a multi-faceted phenomenon with scant data, which offer limited opportunities to adequately measure cultural and creative cities (Van Puyenbroeck et al., 2021). In this paper, we integrate the CCCM framework to propose a spatially contextualized application at the city level as a tool to support policy-makers’ understanding of the potential role of cultural and creative organizations in city development (Soini and Dessein, 2016). We, therefore, build our arguments on a recent stream of research showing the importance of the spatial dimension to understand the relevance of cultural and creative industries within a context and inform decision‐makers (Boal‐San Miguel and Herrero‐Prieto, 2020). This spatial dimension is even more important at the city level, where public, private, and non‐profit organizations interact to execute culture‐led policies (Bonet and Négrier, 2018). In this case, the location of specific organizations may be critical in offering opportunities at the neighborhood level, paving the way to space‐driven local level policies (e.g., the 15 min walking strategy; see e.g., Pisano, 2020).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1075779
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