Reelin is a large secreted extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing an important role in early neurodevelopment. Several genetic studies found an association between RELN gene and increased risk of autism suggesting that reelin deficiency may be a vulnerability factor in its etiology. Moreover, a reduced reelin expression has been observed in several brain regions of subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Since a number of reports have documented presence of vocal and neuromotor abnormalities in patients with autism and suggested that these dysfunctions predate the onset of the syndrome, we performed a fine-grain characterization of the neonatal vocal and motor repertoire in reelin mutant mice to explore the developmental precursors of the disorder. Our findings evidence a general delay in motor and vocal development in heterozygous (50% reduced reelin) and reeler (lacking reelin gene) mutant mice. As a whole, an increased number of calls characterized heterozygous pup's emission. Furthermore, the typical ontogenetic peak in the number of calls characterizing wild-type pups on postnatal day 4 appeared slightly delayed in heterozygous pups (to day 6) and was quite absent in reeler littermates, which exhibited a flat profile during development. We also detected a preferential use of a specific call category (two-components) by heterozygous and reeler mice at postnatal days 6 and 8 as compared to their wild-type littermates. With regard to the analysis of spontaneous movements, a differential profile emerged early in development among the three genotypes. While only slight coordination difficulties are exhibited by heterozygous pups, all indices of motor development appear delayed in reeler mice. Overall, our results evidence a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reelin mutant pups. © 2013 Romano et al.

Characterization of Neonatal Vocal and Motor Repertoire of Reelin Mutant Mice

Michetti C.;
2013

Abstract

Reelin is a large secreted extracellular matrix glycoprotein playing an important role in early neurodevelopment. Several genetic studies found an association between RELN gene and increased risk of autism suggesting that reelin deficiency may be a vulnerability factor in its etiology. Moreover, a reduced reelin expression has been observed in several brain regions of subjects with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Since a number of reports have documented presence of vocal and neuromotor abnormalities in patients with autism and suggested that these dysfunctions predate the onset of the syndrome, we performed a fine-grain characterization of the neonatal vocal and motor repertoire in reelin mutant mice to explore the developmental precursors of the disorder. Our findings evidence a general delay in motor and vocal development in heterozygous (50% reduced reelin) and reeler (lacking reelin gene) mutant mice. As a whole, an increased number of calls characterized heterozygous pup's emission. Furthermore, the typical ontogenetic peak in the number of calls characterizing wild-type pups on postnatal day 4 appeared slightly delayed in heterozygous pups (to day 6) and was quite absent in reeler littermates, which exhibited a flat profile during development. We also detected a preferential use of a specific call category (two-components) by heterozygous and reeler mice at postnatal days 6 and 8 as compared to their wild-type littermates. With regard to the analysis of spontaneous movements, a differential profile emerged early in development among the three genotypes. While only slight coordination difficulties are exhibited by heterozygous pups, all indices of motor development appear delayed in reeler mice. Overall, our results evidence a genotype-dependent deviation in ultrasonic vocal repertoire and a general delay in motor development in reelin mutant pups. © 2013 Romano et al.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1071941
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 17
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact