Maintaining a stable gait requires a dynamic balance control, that can be altered in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Stroke (ST), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The understanding of the strategy for Center of Mass (CoM) positioning adopted by patients during walking is important to be able to program treatments aimed at improving gait control and preventing falls. Forty-four persons with a mild-to-moderate neurological disorder (20 with MS, 14 with ST, 10 with PD) underwent clinical examination and gait analysis. Ten Healthy Subjects (HS) walking at matched speed provided the normative data. Dynamic balance was assessed using the margin of stability (MoS). It was calculated as the distance between the extrapolated Center of Pressure and the extrapolated CoM at mid-stance. The MoS values for lower limbs were calculated in patients and compared with speed-matched values of HS. Persons with neurological disorder showed increased MoS in the medio-lateral direction with respect to HS. Within-group comparison analysis showed a symmetry between lower limbs in HS (Mean (95%CI) [mm], dominant vs non-dominant limb, 43.3 (31.9–54.6) vs 42.9 (28.8–56.9)) and PD (less affected vs more affected limb, 71.1 (59.8–82.5) vs 72.5 (58.5–86.6)), while a significant asymmetry was found in MS (54.4 (46.4–62.4) vs 81.1 (71.2–91.1)) and ST (52.1 (42.6–61.7) vs 74.7 (62.8–86.6)) participants. The history of falls was comparable among PD, MS, and ST groups, and the MoS in the frontal plane showed a strong correlation with these records. Objective assessment of MoS revealed pathology-specific strategies showing different impacts in MS, ST, and PD on the ability to control CoM information to manage the balance between limbs during gait. MoS evaluation will provide useful information to address a tailored rehabilitation program and to monitor disease progression.

Strategies for maintaining dynamic balance in persons with neurological disorders during overground walking

Lencioni T.;Carpinella I.;Castagna A.;Gervasoni E.;Pelosin E.;Cattaneo D.;
2021

Abstract

Maintaining a stable gait requires a dynamic balance control, that can be altered in persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Stroke (ST), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). The understanding of the strategy for Center of Mass (CoM) positioning adopted by patients during walking is important to be able to program treatments aimed at improving gait control and preventing falls. Forty-four persons with a mild-to-moderate neurological disorder (20 with MS, 14 with ST, 10 with PD) underwent clinical examination and gait analysis. Ten Healthy Subjects (HS) walking at matched speed provided the normative data. Dynamic balance was assessed using the margin of stability (MoS). It was calculated as the distance between the extrapolated Center of Pressure and the extrapolated CoM at mid-stance. The MoS values for lower limbs were calculated in patients and compared with speed-matched values of HS. Persons with neurological disorder showed increased MoS in the medio-lateral direction with respect to HS. Within-group comparison analysis showed a symmetry between lower limbs in HS (Mean (95%CI) [mm], dominant vs non-dominant limb, 43.3 (31.9–54.6) vs 42.9 (28.8–56.9)) and PD (less affected vs more affected limb, 71.1 (59.8–82.5) vs 72.5 (58.5–86.6)), while a significant asymmetry was found in MS (54.4 (46.4–62.4) vs 81.1 (71.2–91.1)) and ST (52.1 (42.6–61.7) vs 74.7 (62.8–86.6)) participants. The history of falls was comparable among PD, MS, and ST groups, and the MoS in the frontal plane showed a strong correlation with these records. Objective assessment of MoS revealed pathology-specific strategies showing different impacts in MS, ST, and PD on the ability to control CoM information to manage the balance between limbs during gait. MoS evaluation will provide useful information to address a tailored rehabilitation program and to monitor disease progression.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1070656
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