Background: Women with breast cancer (BC) represent a special population particularly exposed to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, cardiologic assessment in BC is mostly limited to detection of left ventricular dysfunction cardiotoxicity (LVD-CTX) due to anticancer treatments. Our aim was to comprehensively investigate CV profile and events in a contemporary BC cohort. Methods and Results: Records of BC patients referred for a Cardio-Oncologic evaluation before starting anticancer treatments, between 2016 and 2019, were retrospectively reviewed (n = 508). Information regarding prevalence and control of CV risk factors, and novel CVD diagnoses were extracted. Occurrence of LVD-CTX, CV events other than LVD-CTX and mortality was assessed. Mean age of study population was 64 ± 13 years; 287 patients were scheduled to receive anthracycline and 165 antiHER2 therapy. Overall, 53% of BC women had ≥2 CV risk factors, and 67% had at least one of arterial hypertension, dyslipidaemia or diabetes mellitus not adequately controlled. Eighteen (4%) patients were diagnosed a previously unknown CVD. Over a mean followup of 2.5 ± 1 years, 3% of BC patients developed LVD-CTX, 2% suffered from other CV events and 11% died. CV risk factors were not associated with LVD-CTX, except for family history of CAD. On the contrary, patients with other CV events exhibited a worse CV profile. Those who died more commonly experienced CV events other than LVD-CTX (p = 0.02). Conclusions: BC women show a suboptimal CV risk profile and are at risk of CV events not limited to LVD-CTX. A baseline Cardio-Oncologic evaluation was instrumental to implement CV prevention and to optimize CV therapies.

Diversity of Cardiologic Issues in a Contemporary Cohort of Women With Breast Cancer

Giacomo Tini;Pietro Ameri;Giulia Buzzatti;Matteo Sarocchi;Roberto Murialdo;Giulia Guglielmi;Eleonora Arboscello;Alberto Ballestrero;Lucia Del Mastro;Paolo Spallarossa;Italo Porto
2021

Abstract

Background: Women with breast cancer (BC) represent a special population particularly exposed to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, cardiologic assessment in BC is mostly limited to detection of left ventricular dysfunction cardiotoxicity (LVD-CTX) due to anticancer treatments. Our aim was to comprehensively investigate CV profile and events in a contemporary BC cohort. Methods and Results: Records of BC patients referred for a Cardio-Oncologic evaluation before starting anticancer treatments, between 2016 and 2019, were retrospectively reviewed (n = 508). Information regarding prevalence and control of CV risk factors, and novel CVD diagnoses were extracted. Occurrence of LVD-CTX, CV events other than LVD-CTX and mortality was assessed. Mean age of study population was 64 ± 13 years; 287 patients were scheduled to receive anthracycline and 165 antiHER2 therapy. Overall, 53% of BC women had ≥2 CV risk factors, and 67% had at least one of arterial hypertension, dyslipidaemia or diabetes mellitus not adequately controlled. Eighteen (4%) patients were diagnosed a previously unknown CVD. Over a mean followup of 2.5 ± 1 years, 3% of BC patients developed LVD-CTX, 2% suffered from other CV events and 11% died. CV risk factors were not associated with LVD-CTX, except for family history of CAD. On the contrary, patients with other CV events exhibited a worse CV profile. Those who died more commonly experienced CV events other than LVD-CTX (p = 0.02). Conclusions: BC women show a suboptimal CV risk profile and are at risk of CV events not limited to LVD-CTX. A baseline Cardio-Oncologic evaluation was instrumental to implement CV prevention and to optimize CV therapies.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1060398
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