Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, an anion channel that regulates epithelial surface fluid secretion. The deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del) is the most common CFTR mutation. F508del CFTR is characterized by folding and trafficking defects, resulting in decreased functional expression of the protein on the plasma membrane. Several classes of small molecules, named correctors, have been developed to rescue defective F508del CFTR. Although individual correctors failed to improve the clinical status of CF patients carrying the F508del mutation, better results were obtained using correctors combinations. These results were obtained according to the premise that the administration of correctors having different sites of action should enhance F508del CFTR rescue. We investigated the putative site of action of an aminoarylthiazole 4-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-(3-(methylthio)phenyl)thiazol-2-amine, named FCG, with proven CFTR corrector activity, and its synergistic effect with the corrector VX809. We found that neither the total expression nor the maturation of WT CFTR transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was influenced by FCG, administrated alone or in combination with VX809. On the contrary, FCG was able to enhance F508del CFTR total expression, and its combination with VX809 provided a further effect, being able to increase not only the total expression but also the maturation of the mutant protein. Analyses on different CFTR domains and groups of domains, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, show that NBD2 is necessary for FCG corrector activity. Molecular modelling analyses suggest that FCG interacts with a putative region located into the NBD2, ascribing this molecule to class II correctors. Our study indicates that the continuous development and testing of combinations of correctors targeting different structural and functional defects of mutant CFTR is the best strategy to ensure a valuable therapeutic perspective to a larger cohort of CF patients.

Nbd2 is required for the rescue of mutant f508del cftr by a thiazole-based molecule: A class ii corrector for the multi-drug therapy of cystic fibrosis

Parodi A.;Millo E.;Cichero E.;
2021

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, an anion channel that regulates epithelial surface fluid secretion. The deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (F508del) is the most common CFTR mutation. F508del CFTR is characterized by folding and trafficking defects, resulting in decreased functional expression of the protein on the plasma membrane. Several classes of small molecules, named correctors, have been developed to rescue defective F508del CFTR. Although individual correctors failed to improve the clinical status of CF patients carrying the F508del mutation, better results were obtained using correctors combinations. These results were obtained according to the premise that the administration of correctors having different sites of action should enhance F508del CFTR rescue. We investigated the putative site of action of an aminoarylthiazole 4-(3-chlorophenyl)-N-(3-(methylthio)phenyl)thiazol-2-amine, named FCG, with proven CFTR corrector activity, and its synergistic effect with the corrector VX809. We found that neither the total expression nor the maturation of WT CFTR transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells was influenced by FCG, administrated alone or in combination with VX809. On the contrary, FCG was able to enhance F508del CFTR total expression, and its combination with VX809 provided a further effect, being able to increase not only the total expression but also the maturation of the mutant protein. Analyses on different CFTR domains and groups of domains, heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells, show that NBD2 is necessary for FCG corrector activity. Molecular modelling analyses suggest that FCG interacts with a putative region located into the NBD2, ascribing this molecule to class II correctors. Our study indicates that the continuous development and testing of combinations of correctors targeting different structural and functional defects of mutant CFTR is the best strategy to ensure a valuable therapeutic perspective to a larger cohort of CF patients.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1059300
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