A low protein diet (LPD) has historically been used to delay uremic symptoms and decrease nitrogen (N)-derived catabolic products in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In recent years it has become evident that nutritional intervention is a necessary approach to prevent wasting and reduce CKD complications and disease progression. While a 0.6 g/kg, high biological value protein-based LPD has been used for years, recent observational studies suggest that plant-derived LPDs are a better approach to nutritional treatment of CKD. However, plant proteins are less anabolic than animal proteins and amino acids contained in plant proteins may be in part oxidized; thus, they may not completely be used for protein synthesis. In this review, we evaluate the role of LPDs and plant-based LPDs on maintaining skeletal muscle mass in patients with CKD and examine different nutritional approaches for improving the anabolic properties of plant proteins when used in protein-restricted diets.

Low protein diets and plant-based low protein diets: Do they meet protein requirements of patients with chronic kidney disease?

Verzola D.;Picciotto D.;Saio M.;Sukkar S. G.;Esposito P.;Viazzi F.;Garibotto G.
2021

Abstract

A low protein diet (LPD) has historically been used to delay uremic symptoms and decrease nitrogen (N)-derived catabolic products in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In recent years it has become evident that nutritional intervention is a necessary approach to prevent wasting and reduce CKD complications and disease progression. While a 0.6 g/kg, high biological value protein-based LPD has been used for years, recent observational studies suggest that plant-derived LPDs are a better approach to nutritional treatment of CKD. However, plant proteins are less anabolic than animal proteins and amino acids contained in plant proteins may be in part oxidized; thus, they may not completely be used for protein synthesis. In this review, we evaluate the role of LPDs and plant-based LPDs on maintaining skeletal muscle mass in patients with CKD and examine different nutritional approaches for improving the anabolic properties of plant proteins when used in protein-restricted diets.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1037233
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