International newspapers and experts have called 3D printing the industrial revolution of this century. Among all its available variants, the fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique is of greater interest since its application is possible using simple desktop printers. FDM is a complex process, characterized by a large number of parameters that influence the quality and final properties of the product. In particular, in the case of semicrystalline polymers, which afford better mechanical properties than amorphous ones, it is necessary to understand the crystallization kinetics as the processing conditions vary, in order to be able to develop models that allow having a better control over the process and consequently on the final properties of the material. In this work it was proposed to study the crystallization kinetics of two different polyamides used for FDM 3D printing and to link it to the microstructure and properties obtained during FDM. The kinetics are studied both in isothermal and fast cooling conditions, thanks to a home-built device which allows mimicking the quenching experienced during filament deposition. The temperature history of a single filament is then determined by mean of a micro-thermocouple and the final crystallinity of the sample printed in a variety of conditions is assessed by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the applied processing conditions always allowed for the achievement of the maximum crystallinity, although in one condition the polyamide mesomorphic phase possibly develops. Despite the degree of crystallinity is not a strong function of printing variables, the weld strength of adjacent layers shows remarkable variations. In particular, a decrease of its value with printing speed is observed, linked to the probable development of molecular anisotropy under the more extreme printing conditions.

Fused deposition modeling of polyamides: Crystallization and weld formation

Costanzo A.;Spotorno R.;Fenni S. E.;Cavallo D.
2020

Abstract

International newspapers and experts have called 3D printing the industrial revolution of this century. Among all its available variants, the fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique is of greater interest since its application is possible using simple desktop printers. FDM is a complex process, characterized by a large number of parameters that influence the quality and final properties of the product. In particular, in the case of semicrystalline polymers, which afford better mechanical properties than amorphous ones, it is necessary to understand the crystallization kinetics as the processing conditions vary, in order to be able to develop models that allow having a better control over the process and consequently on the final properties of the material. In this work it was proposed to study the crystallization kinetics of two different polyamides used for FDM 3D printing and to link it to the microstructure and properties obtained during FDM. The kinetics are studied both in isothermal and fast cooling conditions, thanks to a home-built device which allows mimicking the quenching experienced during filament deposition. The temperature history of a single filament is then determined by mean of a micro-thermocouple and the final crystallinity of the sample printed in a variety of conditions is assessed by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that the applied processing conditions always allowed for the achievement of the maximum crystallinity, although in one condition the polyamide mesomorphic phase possibly develops. Despite the degree of crystallinity is not a strong function of printing variables, the weld strength of adjacent layers shows remarkable variations. In particular, a decrease of its value with printing speed is observed, linked to the probable development of molecular anisotropy under the more extreme printing conditions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1035558
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