Purpose: Non-resective pharyngoplasty techniques have been shown to be effective to treat oropharyngeal collapse in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The aim of our study is to evaluate outcome predictors in a cohort of patients affected by OSAHS and treated with non-resective pharyngoplasty, including variation of pharyngeal measures at the end of the surgical procedure. Methods: A cohort of patients affected by OSAHS, with palatal or lateral pharyngeal wall collapse, who underwent non-resective pharyngoplasty, were enrolled between 2014 and 2017. Surgical procedures encompassed non-resective pharyngoplasty by expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty (ESP) or barbed antero-lateral pharyngoplasty with barbed reposition pharyngoplasty (BRP) or barbed suspension pharyngoplasty (BSP) techniques, eventually associated with nasal surgery. Pharyngeal measures were recorded intraoperatively and their variation at the end of the procedure was considered. Surgical success was evaluated at least 6 months after surgery with respiratory polygraphy and ESS questionnaire. Outcome predictors were examined by multivariable logistic regression and ROC curve analysis. Results: Seventy patients met the study inclusion criteria. ESP, BRP, and BSP in a uni-/multilevel setting led to significant improvement of all respiratory polygraphic parameters and daily sleepiness (p < 0.0001). Outcome analysis showed that greater variation of antero-posterior pharyngeal measure was associated with success (p = 0.01), with an optimal cutoff value of 8.5 mm; low AHIpre, high ESSpre, and antero-lateral pharyngoplasty with barbed sutures were associated with a higher rate of cure (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Non-resective pharyngoplasty is effective in treating OSAHS patients affected by palatal or lateral pharyngeal wall collapse, and intraoperative variation of antero-posterior width may be a useful tool to predict surgical success.

Outcome predictors for non-resective pharyngoplasty alone or as a part of multilevel surgery, in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

Missale F.;Fragale M.;Incandela F.;Roustan V.;Canevari F. R.;Peretti G.;
2019

Abstract

Purpose: Non-resective pharyngoplasty techniques have been shown to be effective to treat oropharyngeal collapse in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The aim of our study is to evaluate outcome predictors in a cohort of patients affected by OSAHS and treated with non-resective pharyngoplasty, including variation of pharyngeal measures at the end of the surgical procedure. Methods: A cohort of patients affected by OSAHS, with palatal or lateral pharyngeal wall collapse, who underwent non-resective pharyngoplasty, were enrolled between 2014 and 2017. Surgical procedures encompassed non-resective pharyngoplasty by expansion sphincter pharyngoplasty (ESP) or barbed antero-lateral pharyngoplasty with barbed reposition pharyngoplasty (BRP) or barbed suspension pharyngoplasty (BSP) techniques, eventually associated with nasal surgery. Pharyngeal measures were recorded intraoperatively and their variation at the end of the procedure was considered. Surgical success was evaluated at least 6 months after surgery with respiratory polygraphy and ESS questionnaire. Outcome predictors were examined by multivariable logistic regression and ROC curve analysis. Results: Seventy patients met the study inclusion criteria. ESP, BRP, and BSP in a uni-/multilevel setting led to significant improvement of all respiratory polygraphic parameters and daily sleepiness (p < 0.0001). Outcome analysis showed that greater variation of antero-posterior pharyngeal measure was associated with success (p = 0.01), with an optimal cutoff value of 8.5 mm; low AHIpre, high ESSpre, and antero-lateral pharyngoplasty with barbed sutures were associated with a higher rate of cure (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Non-resective pharyngoplasty is effective in treating OSAHS patients affected by palatal or lateral pharyngeal wall collapse, and intraoperative variation of antero-posterior width may be a useful tool to predict surgical success.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1025560
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