The correct design of a system of borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is the primary requirement for attaining high performance with geothermal heat pumps. The design procedure is based on a reliable estimate of ground thermal properties, which can be assessed by a Thermal Response Test (TRT). The TRT analysis is usually performed adopting the Infinite Line Source model and is based on a series of assumptions to which the experiment must comply, including stable initial ground temperatures and a constant heat transfer rate during the experiment. The present paper novelty is related to depth distributed temperature measurements in a series of TRT experiments. The approach is based on the use of special submersible sensors able to record their position inside the pipes. The focus is on the early period of BHE installation, when the grout cement filling the BHE is still chemically reacting, thus releasing extra heat. The comprehensive dataset presented here shows how grout hydration can affect the depth profile of the undisturbed ground temperature and how the temperature evolution in time and space can be used for assessing the correct recovery period for starting the TRT experiment and inferring information on grouting defects along the BHE depth

Experimental Hydration Temperature Increase in Borehole Heat Exchangers during Thermal Response Tests for Geothermal Heat Pump Design

Marco Fossa
2020

Abstract

The correct design of a system of borehole heat exchangers (BHEs) is the primary requirement for attaining high performance with geothermal heat pumps. The design procedure is based on a reliable estimate of ground thermal properties, which can be assessed by a Thermal Response Test (TRT). The TRT analysis is usually performed adopting the Infinite Line Source model and is based on a series of assumptions to which the experiment must comply, including stable initial ground temperatures and a constant heat transfer rate during the experiment. The present paper novelty is related to depth distributed temperature measurements in a series of TRT experiments. The approach is based on the use of special submersible sensors able to record their position inside the pipes. The focus is on the early period of BHE installation, when the grout cement filling the BHE is still chemically reacting, thus releasing extra heat. The comprehensive dataset presented here shows how grout hydration can affect the depth profile of the undisturbed ground temperature and how the temperature evolution in time and space can be used for assessing the correct recovery period for starting the TRT experiment and inferring information on grouting defects along the BHE depth
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1017570
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact