Creating materials with strength and toughness has been a long-sought goal. Conventional engineering materials often face a trade-off between strength and toughness, prompting researchers seeking to overcome these limitations to explore more sophisticated materials, such as composites. This paradigm shift in material design is spurred by nature, which exhibits a plethora of heterogeneous materials that offer outstanding material properties, and many natural materials are widely regarded as examples of high-performing hybrid materials. A classic example is nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, which boasts a combination of high stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness. Various microstructural features contribute to the toughness of nacre, including mineral bridges (MBs), nano-asperities, and waviness of the constituent platelets. Recent research in biomimicry suggests that MBs contribute to the high strength and toughness observed in nacre and nacre-inspired materials. However, previous work in this area did not allow for complete control over the length scale of the bridges and had limitations on the volume fraction of mineral content. In this work, we present a systematic investigation elucidating the effects of structural parameters, such as volume fraction of mineral phase and density of MBs, on the mechanical response of nacre-inspired additive manufactured composites. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to tune the composite properties by tuning sizes and content of structural features (e.g. MBs and mineral content) in a heterogeneous material. Looking forward, this systematic approach enables materials-by-design of complex architectures to tackle demanding engineering challenges in the future.

Printing nature: Unraveling the role of nacre's mineral bridges

LIBONATI, FLAVIA;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Creating materials with strength and toughness has been a long-sought goal. Conventional engineering materials often face a trade-off between strength and toughness, prompting researchers seeking to overcome these limitations to explore more sophisticated materials, such as composites. This paradigm shift in material design is spurred by nature, which exhibits a plethora of heterogeneous materials that offer outstanding material properties, and many natural materials are widely regarded as examples of high-performing hybrid materials. A classic example is nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, which boasts a combination of high stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness. Various microstructural features contribute to the toughness of nacre, including mineral bridges (MBs), nano-asperities, and waviness of the constituent platelets. Recent research in biomimicry suggests that MBs contribute to the high strength and toughness observed in nacre and nacre-inspired materials. However, previous work in this area did not allow for complete control over the length scale of the bridges and had limitations on the volume fraction of mineral content. In this work, we present a systematic investigation elucidating the effects of structural parameters, such as volume fraction of mineral phase and density of MBs, on the mechanical response of nacre-inspired additive manufactured composites. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to tune the composite properties by tuning sizes and content of structural features (e.g. MBs and mineral content) in a heterogeneous material. Looking forward, this systematic approach enables materials-by-design of complex architectures to tackle demanding engineering challenges in the future.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1011063
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