Attachment researchers developed statistically validated measures to assess attachment patterns for children (i.e. Strange Situation Procedure) and adults (i.e. Adult Attachment Interview), showing useful clinical applications. Regarding adolescence, the most validated measure is the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA), despite the limitations of being a self-report measures. This pilot-study aims to explore both the preliminary psychometric characteristics and clinical applications of the Italian version of the Friends and Family Interview (FFI), a semi-structured interview designed to assess attachment representations of adolescents (aged 11 to 17 years). The FFI was administered to 66 non clinical adolescents aged 12 to 16 years (44% boys) by three different interviewers. The FFI’s transcripts were coded by two reliable and blinded coders. The FFI’s coding system comprises eight dimensions (Coherence, Reflective Functioning, etc) and classifies attachment into four patterns: secure, insecure-dismissing, insecure-preoccupied, insecure-disorganized, often collapsed into secure/insecure classifications. Participants also completed the verbal subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, as control measure. The FFI secure-insecure classifications were not correlated with adolescent’s gender (Fisher Exact p=.25, n.s.) and ages (F=.720, df= 61, p=.58, n.s.). No potential effect of the interviewer was revealed (p=.86, n.s.). A good inter-rater reliability was found. However, secure participants showed higher verbal IQ score than the insecure ones (F=.377, df= 62, p=.08). From a clinical perspective, the FFI could help clinicians to understand the emotion regulation strategies of adolescents and their mentalizing skills in the clinical assessment. These results substantially strengthen the case for interpreting the FFI as an attachment-related measure for adolescents. Clinical implications of the FFI were further discussed.

The Friends and Family Interview (FFI) to Assess Adolescents’ Attachment Representations: Psychometric Characteristics and Clinical Considerations

Pace C. S.;
2016

Abstract

Attachment researchers developed statistically validated measures to assess attachment patterns for children (i.e. Strange Situation Procedure) and adults (i.e. Adult Attachment Interview), showing useful clinical applications. Regarding adolescence, the most validated measure is the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA), despite the limitations of being a self-report measures. This pilot-study aims to explore both the preliminary psychometric characteristics and clinical applications of the Italian version of the Friends and Family Interview (FFI), a semi-structured interview designed to assess attachment representations of adolescents (aged 11 to 17 years). The FFI was administered to 66 non clinical adolescents aged 12 to 16 years (44% boys) by three different interviewers. The FFI’s transcripts were coded by two reliable and blinded coders. The FFI’s coding system comprises eight dimensions (Coherence, Reflective Functioning, etc) and classifies attachment into four patterns: secure, insecure-dismissing, insecure-preoccupied, insecure-disorganized, often collapsed into secure/insecure classifications. Participants also completed the verbal subtests of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, as control measure. The FFI secure-insecure classifications were not correlated with adolescent’s gender (Fisher Exact p=.25, n.s.) and ages (F=.720, df= 61, p=.58, n.s.). No potential effect of the interviewer was revealed (p=.86, n.s.). A good inter-rater reliability was found. However, secure participants showed higher verbal IQ score than the insecure ones (F=.377, df= 62, p=.08). From a clinical perspective, the FFI could help clinicians to understand the emotion regulation strategies of adolescents and their mentalizing skills in the clinical assessment. These results substantially strengthen the case for interpreting the FFI as an attachment-related measure for adolescents. Clinical implications of the FFI were further discussed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/882596
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