Bone is one of the few tissues to display a true potential for regeneration. Fracture healing is an obvious example where regeneration occurs through tightly regulated sequences of molecular and cellular events which recapitulate tissue formation seen during embryogenesis. Still in some instances, bone regeneration does not occur properly (i.e. critical size lesions) and an appropriate therapeutic intervention is necessary. Successful replacement of bone by tissue engineering will likely depend on the recapitulation of this flow of events. In fact, bone regeneration requires cross-talk between microenvironmental factors and cells; for example, resident mesenchymal progenitors are recruited and properly guided by soluble and insoluble signaling molecules. Tissue engineering attempts to reproduce and to mimic this natural milieu by delivering cells capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, inducing growth factors and biomaterials to support cellular attachment, proliferation, migration, and matrix deposition. In the last two decades, a significant effort has been made by the scientific community in the development of methods and protocols to repair and regenerate tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments. In this same period, great advancements have been achieved in the biology of stem cells and on the mechanisms governing “stemness”. Unfortunately, after two decades, effective clinical translation does not exist, besides a few limited examples. Many years have passed since cell-based regenerative therapies were first described as “promising approaches”, but this definition still engulfs the present literature. Failure to envisage translational cell therapy applications in routine medical practice evidences the existence of unresolved scientific and technical struggles, some of which still puzzle researchers in the field and are presented in this chapter.

Bone tissue engineering: Past-present-future

QUARTO, RODOLFO;GIANNONI, PAOLO
2016-01-01

Abstract

Bone is one of the few tissues to display a true potential for regeneration. Fracture healing is an obvious example where regeneration occurs through tightly regulated sequences of molecular and cellular events which recapitulate tissue formation seen during embryogenesis. Still in some instances, bone regeneration does not occur properly (i.e. critical size lesions) and an appropriate therapeutic intervention is necessary. Successful replacement of bone by tissue engineering will likely depend on the recapitulation of this flow of events. In fact, bone regeneration requires cross-talk between microenvironmental factors and cells; for example, resident mesenchymal progenitors are recruited and properly guided by soluble and insoluble signaling molecules. Tissue engineering attempts to reproduce and to mimic this natural milieu by delivering cells capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, inducing growth factors and biomaterials to support cellular attachment, proliferation, migration, and matrix deposition. In the last two decades, a significant effort has been made by the scientific community in the development of methods and protocols to repair and regenerate tissues such as bone, cartilage, tendons, and ligaments. In this same period, great advancements have been achieved in the biology of stem cells and on the mechanisms governing “stemness”. Unfortunately, after two decades, effective clinical translation does not exist, besides a few limited examples. Many years have passed since cell-based regenerative therapies were first described as “promising approaches”, but this definition still engulfs the present literature. Failure to envisage translational cell therapy applications in routine medical practice evidences the existence of unresolved scientific and technical struggles, some of which still puzzle researchers in the field and are presented in this chapter.
2016
978-1-4939-3582-6
978-1-4939-3584-0
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/871764
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