Robots are at the position to become our everyday companions in the near future. Still, many hurdles need to be cleared to achieve this goal. One of them is the fact that robots are still not able to perceive some important communication cues naturally used by humans, e.g. gaze. In the recent past, eye gaze in robot perception was substituted by its proxy, head orientation. Such an approach is still adopted in many applications today. In this paper we introduce performance improvements to an eye tracking system we previously developed and use it to explore if this approximation is appropriate. More precisely, we compare the impact of the use of eye- or head-based gaze estimation in a human robot interaction experiment with the iCub robot and naïve subjects. We find that the possibility to exploit the richer information carried by eye gaze has a significant impact on the interaction. As a result, our eye tracking system allows for a more efficient human-robot collaboration than a comparable head tracking approach, according to both quantitative measures and subjective evaluation by the human participants.

A Robot reading human gaze: Why eye tracking is better than head tracking for human-robot collaboration

PALINKO, OSKAR;REA, FRANCESCO;SANDINI, GIULIO;
2016-01-01

Abstract

Robots are at the position to become our everyday companions in the near future. Still, many hurdles need to be cleared to achieve this goal. One of them is the fact that robots are still not able to perceive some important communication cues naturally used by humans, e.g. gaze. In the recent past, eye gaze in robot perception was substituted by its proxy, head orientation. Such an approach is still adopted in many applications today. In this paper we introduce performance improvements to an eye tracking system we previously developed and use it to explore if this approximation is appropriate. More precisely, we compare the impact of the use of eye- or head-based gaze estimation in a human robot interaction experiment with the iCub robot and naïve subjects. We find that the possibility to exploit the richer information carried by eye gaze has a significant impact on the interaction. As a result, our eye tracking system allows for a more efficient human-robot collaboration than a comparable head tracking approach, according to both quantitative measures and subjective evaluation by the human participants.
2016
9781509037629
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/864316
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