Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique invented by the TWI [1] has been a significant industrial success over the last decade. The process is based on two main phenomena: mixing and forging of material plasticized thanks to heat generated by friction between a rotating tool and the welded material. Four phases can be distinguished in FSW welding. The key factor of the process is definitely the tool, since ifs responsible for generation of sufficient quantity of heat to enable an efficient mixing of plasticized material in order to create a sound, homogeneous joint. A typical FSW tool is composed of two parts: a shoulder and a probe. It's well known that mechanical properties of metallic materials change with temperature - particularly their tensile strength and yield strength decrease and ductility increases. For that reason the tool must be made of a material characterized by a sufficient mechanical properties, especially toughness and wear resistance at process temperatures, that can reach as much as 80% of the melting temperature of welded material. Given that aluminium alloys have rather low melting point temperature and most of them are characterized by good ductility makes FSW and ideal technique for welding AI based materials, from various groups, even those conventionally considered difficult to weld or not weldable [2]. FSW has also been found to be able to produce sound welds in other structural materials, such as low carbon steels [3], austenitic steels [4], Magnesium alloys [5], Titanium alloys [6], Copper and Nickel based alloys [7] as well as non metallic materials [8]. One of the most commonly used AI alloys is the AA6082-T6, a heat treatable alloy, characterized by good mechanical properties, good weldability with most of the available welding methods and good resistance to corrosion. This paper summarizes the results of FSW welding tests aimed at creating a FSW weldability window and characterization of joints made during the test campaign.

Investigation on Friction Stir Welding weldability of aluminium alloy AA6082-T6

ADAMOWSKI, JAROSLAW ARKADIUZ;GAMBARO, CARLA;PONTE, MATTEO;LERTORA, ENRICO;MONTI, MARGHERITA
2005

Abstract

Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a solid state welding technique invented by the TWI [1] has been a significant industrial success over the last decade. The process is based on two main phenomena: mixing and forging of material plasticized thanks to heat generated by friction between a rotating tool and the welded material. Four phases can be distinguished in FSW welding. The key factor of the process is definitely the tool, since ifs responsible for generation of sufficient quantity of heat to enable an efficient mixing of plasticized material in order to create a sound, homogeneous joint. A typical FSW tool is composed of two parts: a shoulder and a probe. It's well known that mechanical properties of metallic materials change with temperature - particularly their tensile strength and yield strength decrease and ductility increases. For that reason the tool must be made of a material characterized by a sufficient mechanical properties, especially toughness and wear resistance at process temperatures, that can reach as much as 80% of the melting temperature of welded material. Given that aluminium alloys have rather low melting point temperature and most of them are characterized by good ductility makes FSW and ideal technique for welding AI based materials, from various groups, even those conventionally considered difficult to weld or not weldable [2]. FSW has also been found to be able to produce sound welds in other structural materials, such as low carbon steels [3], austenitic steels [4], Magnesium alloys [5], Titanium alloys [6], Copper and Nickel based alloys [7] as well as non metallic materials [8]. One of the most commonly used AI alloys is the AA6082-T6, a heat treatable alloy, characterized by good mechanical properties, good weldability with most of the available welding methods and good resistance to corrosion. This paper summarizes the results of FSW welding tests aimed at creating a FSW weldability window and characterization of joints made during the test campaign.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/252674
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