GRID is a Coordination Action on ICT vulnerabilities of power systems and the relevant defence methodologies. The European power system has been developed in the past 50 years independently by every single country, therefore it is basically a set of interconnected national subsystems. Growing integration of the European electricity market with high level of cross-border exchanges was out of the scope of the original system design. This has led Transmission System Operators to operate the system close to its security limits. Control and protection of the power grid is more and more dependant on distributed and interconnected computer systems. Security challenges for the power grid partly arise from this increasing complexity, autonomy and interoperability. Recent blackouts can be seen in this general context. Power grid vulnerabilities are European wide problems, they cannot be solved individually but require a coordinated European effort. GRID aims at establishing a roadmap for collaborative R&D on power grid security, also based on exchange of information about national, regional and European research projects. Collaborative research programmes might benefit from a mutual exchange of approaches, experiences, and results. However, cross fertilisation may be hampered by existing barriers of an institutional, socio-economic and technical nature. This report investigates barriers to exploitation of national research results in a European context. It provides an overview of current national R&D programmes in the energy sector. Key European economies are investigated, including Germany, UK, France, Italy, Sweden and Norway. Relevant case studies are pointed out concerning: - Fraunhofer Gesellschaft and the Julich research institute in Germany; - Public energy research in the UK, especially on Distributed Power generation; - Italy’s Ricerca di Sistema; - STEM, the Swedish energy research agency; - research on power system vulnerabilities funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers in Norway. Such case studies point out that national research studies concerning power system security have produced a great deal of results whose exploitation out of a national or regional context would be beneficial. However this may be hampered by a number of barriers. These include language (results are often fully documented in the originating country's language only), legislation (e.g. technology requires adaptation of countries energy regulations), background (huge costs of adaptation of specific methodologies out of a national context), restricted access (technology cannot be licensed to third parties; high fees for license are required, etc.).

Analysis of the barriers to the uptake of R&D results in the power sector

DELFINO, FEDERICO
2008

Abstract

GRID is a Coordination Action on ICT vulnerabilities of power systems and the relevant defence methodologies. The European power system has been developed in the past 50 years independently by every single country, therefore it is basically a set of interconnected national subsystems. Growing integration of the European electricity market with high level of cross-border exchanges was out of the scope of the original system design. This has led Transmission System Operators to operate the system close to its security limits. Control and protection of the power grid is more and more dependant on distributed and interconnected computer systems. Security challenges for the power grid partly arise from this increasing complexity, autonomy and interoperability. Recent blackouts can be seen in this general context. Power grid vulnerabilities are European wide problems, they cannot be solved individually but require a coordinated European effort. GRID aims at establishing a roadmap for collaborative R&D on power grid security, also based on exchange of information about national, regional and European research projects. Collaborative research programmes might benefit from a mutual exchange of approaches, experiences, and results. However, cross fertilisation may be hampered by existing barriers of an institutional, socio-economic and technical nature. This report investigates barriers to exploitation of national research results in a European context. It provides an overview of current national R&D programmes in the energy sector. Key European economies are investigated, including Germany, UK, France, Italy, Sweden and Norway. Relevant case studies are pointed out concerning: - Fraunhofer Gesellschaft and the Julich research institute in Germany; - Public energy research in the UK, especially on Distributed Power generation; - Italy’s Ricerca di Sistema; - STEM, the Swedish energy research agency; - research on power system vulnerabilities funded by the Nordic Council of Ministers in Norway. Such case studies point out that national research studies concerning power system security have produced a great deal of results whose exploitation out of a national or regional context would be beneficial. However this may be hampered by a number of barriers. These include language (results are often fully documented in the originating country's language only), legislation (e.g. technology requires adaptation of countries energy regulations), background (huge costs of adaptation of specific methodologies out of a national context), restricted access (technology cannot be licensed to third parties; high fees for license are required, etc.).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/236003
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