There is a wide bibliography about roman stations especially with regard to their relationship with the transport system of the state, their management and the staff that was used there (e.g. stationarii). This system had to be officially established by Augustus (Svet. Aug 49) and was repeatedly reorganized during the imperial age. In all kinds of sources, the stations are referred to in many different ways, and it is not entirely clear whether these differences are due to the register language adopted (official, technical, popular, etc. ) or if the different words correspond to actual administrative distinctions or different planimetry of these buildings. Until the middle of the 4th century AD in literary texts the word statio is ambiguously used, or referring to army barracks, whose main goal would have been to defend the population against crimson (see for example Tert. Apol., 2.8 ), or referring to a not better defined post stop. Since the 4th century AD, the statio is primarily related to roads (cfr. above all, Amm. Marc. 27.4.8, who clearly speaks of cursualis statio). This fact is strengthened by many imperial laws referring to stationarii. This particular military unit confirms the variety of situations where they were employed. The latter sources concerning them are mostly limited to Egypt (papyrus, ostraca, etc.).

Gli stationarii in età imperiale [rec. in: RSA 32 (2002); REA 104, 3-4 (2002); Syl.Ep.Barcin. 4 (2002); Epigraphica 45 (2003); RBPh 81, 1 (2003); MH 60 (2003); A&R n.s. 48, 4 (2003); AArchSlov 54 (2003); BMCR 2003.03.04; Latomus 63, 2 (2004)]

PETRACCIA, MARIA FEDERICA
2001-01-01

Abstract

There is a wide bibliography about roman stations especially with regard to their relationship with the transport system of the state, their management and the staff that was used there (e.g. stationarii). This system had to be officially established by Augustus (Svet. Aug 49) and was repeatedly reorganized during the imperial age. In all kinds of sources, the stations are referred to in many different ways, and it is not entirely clear whether these differences are due to the register language adopted (official, technical, popular, etc. ) or if the different words correspond to actual administrative distinctions or different planimetry of these buildings. Until the middle of the 4th century AD in literary texts the word statio is ambiguously used, or referring to army barracks, whose main goal would have been to defend the population against crimson (see for example Tert. Apol., 2.8 ), or referring to a not better defined post stop. Since the 4th century AD, the statio is primarily related to roads (cfr. above all, Amm. Marc. 27.4.8, who clearly speaks of cursualis statio). This fact is strengthened by many imperial laws referring to stationarii. This particular military unit confirms the variety of situations where they were employed. The latter sources concerning them are mostly limited to Egypt (papyrus, ostraca, etc.).
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/226122
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact