STUDY OBJECTIVES: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is mostly of central origin but it may coexist with sleep-related breathing disorders. However, there is no consensus on the sleep protocols to be used, assessments vary, and only a minority of patients are regularly tested or are on treatment for EDS. Our study presents data on self-reported and objective EDS in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1. METHODS: Sixty-three patients with adult-onset DM1 were subjected to EDS-sleep assessments (polysomnography, Multiple Sleep Latency Test, Epworth Sleepiness Scale). Correlation coefficients were computed to assess the relationship between sleep and sleepiness test results, fatigue, and quality of life. RESULTS: 33% and 48% of patients had EDS based, respectively, on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test, with a low concordance between these tests (k = 0.19). Thirteen patients (20%) displayed 2 or more sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods on Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Patients having EDS by Multiple Sleep Latency Test had a shorter disease duration (P < .05), higher total sleep time and sleep efficiency and lower wake after sleep onset on polysomnography. Patients with self-reported EDS reported significantly higher fatigue score compared with patients without EDS (P < .05). No other difference was found in demographic, clinical, and respiratory features. CONCLUSIONS: EDS test results are contradictory, making treatment options difficult. Combining quantitative tests and self-reported scales may facilitate physicians in planning EDS care with patients and families. CITATION: Sansone VA, Proserpio P, Mauro L, et al. Assessment of self-reported and objective daytime sleepiness in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021;17(12):2383-2391.

Assessment of self-reported and objective daytime sleepiness in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1

Nobili L.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) in myotonic dystrophy type 1 is mostly of central origin but it may coexist with sleep-related breathing disorders. However, there is no consensus on the sleep protocols to be used, assessments vary, and only a minority of patients are regularly tested or are on treatment for EDS. Our study presents data on self-reported and objective EDS in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1. METHODS: Sixty-three patients with adult-onset DM1 were subjected to EDS-sleep assessments (polysomnography, Multiple Sleep Latency Test, Epworth Sleepiness Scale). Correlation coefficients were computed to assess the relationship between sleep and sleepiness test results, fatigue, and quality of life. RESULTS: 33% and 48% of patients had EDS based, respectively, on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test, with a low concordance between these tests (k = 0.19). Thirteen patients (20%) displayed 2 or more sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods on Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Patients having EDS by Multiple Sleep Latency Test had a shorter disease duration (P < .05), higher total sleep time and sleep efficiency and lower wake after sleep onset on polysomnography. Patients with self-reported EDS reported significantly higher fatigue score compared with patients without EDS (P < .05). No other difference was found in demographic, clinical, and respiratory features. CONCLUSIONS: EDS test results are contradictory, making treatment options difficult. Combining quantitative tests and self-reported scales may facilitate physicians in planning EDS care with patients and families. CITATION: Sansone VA, Proserpio P, Mauro L, et al. Assessment of self-reported and objective daytime sleepiness in adult-onset myotonic dystrophy type 1. J Clin Sleep Med. 2021;17(12):2383-2391.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1076366
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