Background: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease associated with high mortality and morbidity worldwide. We sought to determine how socio-economic factors might influence its epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation and management, and outcome, in a large international multi-centre registry. Methods: The EurObservationalProgramme (EORP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) EURO-ENDO registry comprises a prospective cohort of 3113 adult patients admitted for IE in 156 hospitals in 40 countries between January 2016 and March 2018. Patients were separated in 3 groups, according to World Bank economic stratification (Group 1 - high income [75.6%]; Group 2 - upper-middle income [15.4%]; Group 3 - lower-middle income [9.1%]). Results: Group 3 patients were younger (median age [IQR]: Group 1 - 66 [53-75] years; Group 2 - 57 [41-68] years; Group 3 - 33 [26-43] years; p<0.001) with a higher frequency of smokers, intravenous drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (all p<0.001) and presented later (median [IQR) days since symptom onset: Group 1 - 12 [3-35]; Group 2 - 19 [6-54]; Group 3 - 31 [12-62]; p<0.001) with a higher likelihood of developing congestive heart failure (13.6%; 11.1%; and 22.6%, respectively; p<0.001) and persistent fever (9.8%; 14.2%; 27.9%; p<0.001). Among 2157 (69.3%) patients with theoretical indication for cardiac surgery, surgery was performed less frequently in Group 3 patients (75.5%, 76.8% and 51.3%, respectively p<0.001) who also demonstrated the highest mortality (15.0%, 23.0% and 23.7%, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: Socio-economic factors influence the clinical profile of patients presenting with IE across the world. Despite younger age, patients from the poorest countries presented with more frequent complications and higher mortality associated with delayed diagnosis and lower use of surgery.

Socio-Economic Variations Determine the Clinical Presentation, Aetiology and Outcome of Infective Endocarditis: a Prospective Cohort Study from the ESC-EORP EURO-ENDO (European Infective Endocarditis) Registry

F Santini;A Salsano;
2022

Abstract

Background: Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disease associated with high mortality and morbidity worldwide. We sought to determine how socio-economic factors might influence its epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation and management, and outcome, in a large international multi-centre registry. Methods: The EurObservationalProgramme (EORP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) EURO-ENDO registry comprises a prospective cohort of 3113 adult patients admitted for IE in 156 hospitals in 40 countries between January 2016 and March 2018. Patients were separated in 3 groups, according to World Bank economic stratification (Group 1 - high income [75.6%]; Group 2 - upper-middle income [15.4%]; Group 3 - lower-middle income [9.1%]). Results: Group 3 patients were younger (median age [IQR]: Group 1 - 66 [53-75] years; Group 2 - 57 [41-68] years; Group 3 - 33 [26-43] years; p<0.001) with a higher frequency of smokers, intravenous drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (all p<0.001) and presented later (median [IQR) days since symptom onset: Group 1 - 12 [3-35]; Group 2 - 19 [6-54]; Group 3 - 31 [12-62]; p<0.001) with a higher likelihood of developing congestive heart failure (13.6%; 11.1%; and 22.6%, respectively; p<0.001) and persistent fever (9.8%; 14.2%; 27.9%; p<0.001). Among 2157 (69.3%) patients with theoretical indication for cardiac surgery, surgery was performed less frequently in Group 3 patients (75.5%, 76.8% and 51.3%, respectively p<0.001) who also demonstrated the highest mortality (15.0%, 23.0% and 23.7%, respectively; p<0.001). Conclusions: Socio-economic factors influence the clinical profile of patients presenting with IE across the world. Despite younger age, patients from the poorest countries presented with more frequent complications and higher mortality associated with delayed diagnosis and lower use of surgery.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1075180
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