Interaction between peridotite and pyroxenite-derived melts can significantly modify the mineralogy and chemistry of the upper mantle, enhancing its heterogeneity, by creating re-fertilized peridotites and secondary-type pyroxenites. We experimentally investigated the reaction between a fertile lherzolite and MgOrich basaltic andesite produced by partial melting of an olivine-free pyroxenite at 2 GPa and 1300–1450 C. The aim was to constrain the rate and style of melt–peridotite reaction mostly as a function of temperature, i.e. assuming variable physical status of the host peridotite. Experiments juxtaposed pyroxenite on a synthesized fertile lherzolite to evaluate the modal and mineral compositional changes in the fertile lherzolite resulting from the reaction with pyroxenite-derived melt. At 1300 and 1350 C, the reaction produces a thin orthopyroxenerich reaction zone confined between partially molten pyroxenite and modally unmodified subsolidus lherzolite. Chemical changes in minerals of the pyroxenite crystal mush suggest that element diffusion across the pyroxenite–peridotite interface, coupled with orthopyroxene precipitation, plays a role in the reactive crystallization of mantle pyroxenite veins. At 1380 and 1400 C, infiltration of pyroxenite-derived melt significantly modifies the mineralogy and chemistry of the host peridotite by creating orthopyroxene-rich websterites and pyroxene-rich lherzolite. At 1450 C, pyroxenitic melt fluxes into molten peridotite, enhancing peridotite melting and creating a melt-bearing dunite associated with a refractory harzburgite. At a given pressure, bulk compositions of hybrid rocks originating through melt–peridotite interaction are mostly controlled by the chemistry of the reacting melt. Interaction between pyroxenitic melt and peridotite causes XMg and XCr decrease and TiO2 increase in pyroxenes and spinel across the pyroxenite–peridotite boundary. Similar chemical gradients in minerals are observed in pyroxenite–peridotite associations from natural mantle sequences. The comparison with mineral chemistry variations derived by reaction experiments potentially represents a petrologic tool to discriminate between low- versus high-temperature melt–peridotite reactions.

Melt–rock interactions in a veined mantle: pyroxenite–peridotite reaction experiments at 2GPa

Elisabetta Rampone
2022-01-01

Abstract

Interaction between peridotite and pyroxenite-derived melts can significantly modify the mineralogy and chemistry of the upper mantle, enhancing its heterogeneity, by creating re-fertilized peridotites and secondary-type pyroxenites. We experimentally investigated the reaction between a fertile lherzolite and MgOrich basaltic andesite produced by partial melting of an olivine-free pyroxenite at 2 GPa and 1300–1450 C. The aim was to constrain the rate and style of melt–peridotite reaction mostly as a function of temperature, i.e. assuming variable physical status of the host peridotite. Experiments juxtaposed pyroxenite on a synthesized fertile lherzolite to evaluate the modal and mineral compositional changes in the fertile lherzolite resulting from the reaction with pyroxenite-derived melt. At 1300 and 1350 C, the reaction produces a thin orthopyroxenerich reaction zone confined between partially molten pyroxenite and modally unmodified subsolidus lherzolite. Chemical changes in minerals of the pyroxenite crystal mush suggest that element diffusion across the pyroxenite–peridotite interface, coupled with orthopyroxene precipitation, plays a role in the reactive crystallization of mantle pyroxenite veins. At 1380 and 1400 C, infiltration of pyroxenite-derived melt significantly modifies the mineralogy and chemistry of the host peridotite by creating orthopyroxene-rich websterites and pyroxene-rich lherzolite. At 1450 C, pyroxenitic melt fluxes into molten peridotite, enhancing peridotite melting and creating a melt-bearing dunite associated with a refractory harzburgite. At a given pressure, bulk compositions of hybrid rocks originating through melt–peridotite interaction are mostly controlled by the chemistry of the reacting melt. Interaction between pyroxenitic melt and peridotite causes XMg and XCr decrease and TiO2 increase in pyroxenes and spinel across the pyroxenite–peridotite boundary. Similar chemical gradients in minerals are observed in pyroxenite–peridotite associations from natural mantle sequences. The comparison with mineral chemistry variations derived by reaction experiments potentially represents a petrologic tool to discriminate between low- versus high-temperature melt–peridotite reactions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11567/1070094
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