Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex condition with numerous physical, cognitive and emotional symptoms. These may necessitate significant, permanent lifestyle changes for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and their caregivers and families, meaning it is important in contemporary neurological practice to consider including families and/or caregivers in the management of MS. However, existing evidence suggests that family involvement is not always beneficial; for example, it can exert either a strong positive or negative influence on the ability of PwMS to achieve optimal outcomes from their treatment and disease management. This paper, based on a live debate between neurologists and PwMS, examines the current perceptions on constructive involvement of families and caregivers in consultations for and management of MS, and reveals several areas where additional studies are warranted. Shared decision-making in MS has historically been a collaboration solely between healthcare professionals (HCPs) and PwMS, but PwMS are now more frequently being accompanied to appointments by a support person. This paper encourages HCPs to understand the dynamics between PwMS and their support person, and to individualize consultations and information accordingly. Family and caregiver involvement in the provision of care for PwMS needs to be for the benefit of, and at the discretion of, the PwMS. Support for families of PwMS, although important, may be more effectively and appropriately delivered through other channels outside of the clinical setting. Educating HCPs on the current patient experience to enable them to provide improved personalized care will ensure a mutualistic, patient-centred relationship with PwMS, which will help to optimize outcomes. Communication tools may also facilitate these interactions.

Caregiver Involvement in MS: Duty or Disruption?

Laroni A.;
2021

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex condition with numerous physical, cognitive and emotional symptoms. These may necessitate significant, permanent lifestyle changes for people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and their caregivers and families, meaning it is important in contemporary neurological practice to consider including families and/or caregivers in the management of MS. However, existing evidence suggests that family involvement is not always beneficial; for example, it can exert either a strong positive or negative influence on the ability of PwMS to achieve optimal outcomes from their treatment and disease management. This paper, based on a live debate between neurologists and PwMS, examines the current perceptions on constructive involvement of families and caregivers in consultations for and management of MS, and reveals several areas where additional studies are warranted. Shared decision-making in MS has historically been a collaboration solely between healthcare professionals (HCPs) and PwMS, but PwMS are now more frequently being accompanied to appointments by a support person. This paper encourages HCPs to understand the dynamics between PwMS and their support person, and to individualize consultations and information accordingly. Family and caregiver involvement in the provision of care for PwMS needs to be for the benefit of, and at the discretion of, the PwMS. Support for families of PwMS, although important, may be more effectively and appropriately delivered through other channels outside of the clinical setting. Educating HCPs on the current patient experience to enable them to provide improved personalized care will ensure a mutualistic, patient-centred relationship with PwMS, which will help to optimize outcomes. Communication tools may also facilitate these interactions.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11567/1062587
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